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hello everyone. i am having great difficulty understanding the above concepts.

i was given an assignment where I have to provide rise/fall intonation patterns and fall/rise intonation patterns. Despite, havving thoroughly read the material in my lesson, I am just clueless how to answer the 4 sentences. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you.

a. I’m going to tell you a story.

1. rise/fall intonation pattern:

2. fall/rise intonation pattern:

b. She’s not going out tonight, is she?

1. rise/fall intonation pattern:

2. fall/rise intonation pattern:

c. I don’t understand.

1. rise/fall intonation pattern:

2. fall/rise intonation pattern:

d. Goodnight!

1. rise/fall intonation pattern:

2. fall/rise intonation pattern:

Comments  
Anonymousa. I’m going to tell you a story.

b. She’s not going out tonight, is she?

c. I don’t understand.

d. Goodnight! It seems that ESL students who are really devoted to this subject find the analysis mechanics they learn fail to capture what they hear from natives.
Of course you can change the emphasis to different words to give a sentence many different meanings. But then, emphasis and pitch aren't really the same thing.
Example b. is the only one that strikes me as black and white, and even that one has more than two possible interpretations. You can rise or fall or dip or go up and down on any given syllable, and you can make one syllable higher or lower than the previous one. I don't really know what set of tools you're working with.

In example b., if you make "is" higher than "she," (especially if you emphasize "out") you're stating what you believe the facts are, as a rhetorical question, answer optional.

How about: outEmotion: wave;tonight (lo); is (lo); sheEmotion: wave ?
This is a genuine question, and you'd be surprised or disappointed to find the answer's "Yes."

hey mate im stuck on the same question maybe we can help each other my email is Email Removed
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
It's unclear whether the answers are supposed to be written or spoken.
It seems more likely to me that you are supposed to say each of these four phrases in two ways. If so, it's rather difficult to answer in writing!

CJ
EVERYTHING DEPENDS ON THE CONTEXT I SUPPOSE......
give me 5 example of rising falling
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
For me, it is better to study it first then try exercises... and find yourself a teacher to help you like you can have a tutor or your teacher in class...

But:
-First I’ll tell you about rising-falling intonation. In rising-falling intonation the speaker’s pitch rises and falls on the focus word in a sentence (you learned about focus words in last week’s lesson). The final falling pitch indicates that the speaker is finished talking.
-Fall-rise intonation describes how the voice falls and then rises. We use fall-rise intonation at the end of statements when we want to say that we are not sure
tOo me aahaha