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(Buildings) (Buildings) |

(top of the road)...................(bottom of the road) | [a

(Buildings) (Buildings) | n

|ot

| her

| Road]

Let assume there is a road(violet colour road), as I shown above, and on its both sides are covered by buildings. If we walk from the top of the road down to the bottom of the road, we will end up with another road which ...................................... .

I don't know how to descripe the road which I highlighed in blue colour. Could you fill the blank space........................

Please help me.
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Sorry, Gary, but your graphics are not good. Does Violet Road end at Blue Road, or do they intersect and both continue on, or...? In either event, I guess we will end up with another road which meets/intersects/crosses Violet Road.
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If the road is on a hill, we walk 'down the road' in the direction that makes us walk downhill, and walk 'up the road' in the direction that makes us go uphill.

Your drawing shows what we would call a T-Junction in the UK. The roads form the shape of the letter T.
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You are almost correct.

Thank you Mister Micawber.

Then comes my question :

(1) If I walk from the top of the violet road to the end of the road where meets the blue road. How should I say, "I am walking across/along/down/ the road."

I wonder if you understand my doubt.
When we are following a reasonably level road, we can use along, up, or down interchangeably. If the road obviously ascends steeply, we normally don't use down, and when it descends steeply, we don't use up. There are also local customs-- if the road runs toward a larger urban area, natives may use 'down' or 'up' preferentially. Some also recognize a northbound road by using 'up' and a southbound road by using 'down'.

In your example, along, up and down are all common and about equally likely. Across is wrong, as it means from one side of the road to the other.
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Thank you Mister Micawber very much. Your explanation helped me a lot.

Only one doubt :
If the road obviously ascends steeply, we normally don't use down, and when it descends steeply, we don't use up.
You explained, if the road obviously ascends steeply, we don't use down. Then, I wonder, what we use if we are coming down from the steep road. Shall we say, "I am climbing up/down the road, respectively".

Please help me.
 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.