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Now I'll never retrieve my ten-year pin because it rolled _____the refrigerator.

A) below
B) over
C) around
D) behind


The correct answer is D.

What if the pin is under the fridge? How should call that? roll below or roll under?P lease advise.

LC
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I'd say: "roll under" - or to be more precise: "It has rolled under..."
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Thanks. Yet what is the difference between under and below? They look the same to me to certain degree. Please advise.

LC
Yes, they are very similar, but there are differences. This is a quote from the BBC website:

"Both of these words can mean 'in a lower position than', so there's a sense in which they mean the same thing. But we use them sometimes in different circumstances, for example, if you're talking about something being covered by something, we use 'under'. So, 'I hid the key under a rock'. Or, 'officials said there was nothing under President Bush's jacket'.

You use 'below' when you're talking about something that's not physically immediately under, or not necessarily immediately under. So you say, 'below the surface of the water'. That might be anywhere below the surface of the water, not necessarily just touching it. Or, 'twenty miles below the earth's surface', definitely not immediately under it."

To see more details: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/1535_questionanswer/page32.shtml
I understand now. Thank you.

LC
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