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The mathematical and scientific facts, laws, or principles are dictated by the nature. We, humans, only discover them and find relations between them - how one affects the other. This is the essence of objectiveness of scientific approach where one couldn't incorporate one's own personal beliefs and prejudices in one's findings.

It's true that almost all the languages around the world share some similarities between them. I haven't ever consulted any grammar book on my native language except when they forced me to memorize some of it in the schooldays. That's why it's called the native tongue. I remember once someone, I believe it was Amy (Yankee), who told me that a preposition is always followed by a noun phrase. This a kind of rule in English language. Who made this rule? Why can't one break this rule? A language is not an invention of a single individual - it's a colllective ownership. I'm sure there would be many other rules of this kind and surely I have practiced them infinite times. In general, how such rules come into being? Please do list some of them. I'm not a linguist, so I request you to keep your approach simple and straightforward. Thank you.

preposition
a function word that typically combines with a noun phrase to form a phrase which usually expresses a modification or predication
[M-W's Col. Dic.]
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Apologies, Jack...

We certainly strayed off-topic!
I learn more from these off-topic discussions! Emotion: smile
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The "millionth word" nonsense shouldn't be taken seriously.
Here's what Ben Zimmer and Pullum had to say (they are two famous linguists):
http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=972

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=1497

It was basically a publicity stunt, and counting words makes little sense anyway. If you count "lemmas" (= dictionary entries, that is, "window", "windows", and "windowless" are not separate words), then I'm afraid that you don't need many words to be a fluent and educated speaker. I think I heard that an active vocabulary of about 15,000 lemmas would be more than enough (I'm not sure though... 15,000 lemmas to me sounds like a lot). Open a dictionary, and you'll probably see that most words there are not part of your active vocabulary (or even passive). You might not know new or technical words like "sexting" or "malware", but that doesn't necessarily mean that those who know those words have a larger vocabulary. After all, everyone uses the same words most of the time, plus some additional "weird" words: older people might use additional old-fashioned words, and younger people additional new slang.
AlpheccaStarsBut, CB, these new words are coined by the common man, for the common man!
You are of course right, A-Emotion: stars! I wasn't talking about the kind of words you mentioned at all. My focus wason the kind of words that make English vocabulary larger than that of many other languages. Words similar to the ones you mentioned make their way into the vocabularies of many (most?) other languages for the simple reason that they are needed or at least commonly used by the common man, not just specialists. In this respect there is nothing exceptional about English.

The number of English words that are really used by people may be large but equally many words are used in many other languages. For example, when a large dictionary of the Finnish language was compiled about 50 years ago, the scholars had about 800,000 words at their disposal. They discarded 75 percent of them and included only 200,000 words.

CB
Cool BreezeWords similar to the ones you mentioned make their way into the vocabularies of many (most?) other languages
Hi CB: I was wondering if these newly coined words just are added to the native language "as-is," or is there an attempt at translation. I've heard that the French language authority has tried to do this to prevent English contamination, but in spite of their efforts, the French still say "le weekend" (etc.)
Cool BreezeFor example, when a large dictionary of the Finnish language was compiled about 50 years ago, the scholars had about 800,000 words at their disposal. They discarded 75 percent of them and included only 200,000 words.
In English, the shorter dictionary is called the "Abridged Edition." One problem that the lexicographers have is to pick out the prime words for inclusion in the abridged edition.
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AlpheccaStarsI was wondering if these newly coined words just are added to the native language "as-is," or is there an attempt at translation.
My apologies.Emotion: embarrassed I probably didn't use the best word (similar) in my reply. What I really meant was that new words are added to all languages all the time. As new gadgets are invented, as technology progresses, new words are needed in all languages. We don't make a conscious attempt to translate words from English into Finnish.Malware is haittaohjelma or haittaohjelmat in Finnish, for example. Weekend is viikonloppu, and as far as I know, no one has ever called it anything resembling the English word.

However, many computer nerds do use, sometimes facetiously, words "translated" from English. I have heard the verb seivata (to save) used in Finnish. I don't think anyone would use it in serious writing or even serious speech, though. There are some computer terminology words that resemble the English word. If a word can be formed without violating the phonetic laws of Finnish, it is possible that a new word derived from an English word gains ground and is finally accepted as a genuine Finnish word. Kursori from cursoris one example that comes to mind. (The English word is derived from the Latin verb that means 'to run', so it is quite fitting in both languages!Emotion: smile)

CB
Cool BreezeWe don't make a conscious attempt to translate words from English into Finnish. Malware is haittaohjelma or haittaohjelmat in Finnish, for example. Weekend is viikonloppu, and as far as I know, no one has ever called it anything resembling the English word.
Interesting. Italians are "retarded", because they use an awful lot of English words: they even replace common Italian words with English equivalents, for apparently no reason. Malware in Italian is just malware, and "weekend" is commonly used instead of "fine settimana". Most tech terms are in English, for example "mouse" and "monitor" are the standard words in Italian. The problem is when stupid journalists even replace "ospite" with "guest", "spiaggia" with "beach", "festa" with "party", etc., just because using English words sounds "cool" (and "cool" is another word they sometimes use).
Cool Breezehat depends on what you want to call for example in in this sentence: What is he interested in? A question mark follows in, not a noun phrase.
The noun phrase has moved. In "deep structure" (or whatever people are calling it these days), the sentence is:

"He is interested in what?"

If English had more case marking, you would be able to see this better. Assuming you speak a whom-dialect, you can see it there:

"Whom is he interested in?"

The accusative case on "who" happens because it is initially the object of the preposition before moving to the beginning of the sentence.
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Jackson6612Who made this rule? Why can't one break this rule?
Linguists did. "Rules" in this sense is purely descriptive. It is a description of how people speak, not a suggestion for how to speak. Linguists catalogue language, analyze it for patterns which they call "rules", and then form theories about why and how these rules interact and how they are acquired by learners of the language. If we notice that people use systematically different ways of speaking, then we start to classify them as speakers of different dialects of languges.

And you can break it if you want, you'll just sound weird. Also, different dialects may "obey" rules in different ways. For instance, some English speakers allow double negation ("I didn't do nothing"), while others do not allow for double negation. Linguists have described both sets of rules. Neither of them is superior, objectively speaking. Society at large, however, has decided that double negation is not acceptable in formal langauge. But that has nothing to do with what counts as a rule.

You should read the wiki article describing the difference between prescriptive and descriptive grammar for a more full account.
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