+0
Rumor had it that Chao reaped huge profits from inside trading.

Rumor has it that Chao reaped huge profits from inside trading.

Do both of the above sound right to you? Thanks.
+0
Hi Angliholic

Continuous tenses seem fitting to me since the reaping was probably going on at about the time the rumor mill was whispering about it:

Rumor had it that Chao was reaping/had reaped huge profits from inside trading.

Rumor has it that Chao is reaping/has reaped huge profits from inside trading.
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
YankeeHi Angliholic

Continuous tenses seem fitting to me since the reaping was probably going on at about the time the rumor mill was whispering about it:

Rumor had it that Chao was reaping/had reaped huge profits from inside trading.

Rumor has it that Chao is reaping/has reaped huge profits from inside trading.

Thanks, Amy.

I agree with you that continuouse tenses seem fitting better.

By the way, I find the highlighted part in blue very amusing and confusing at the same time.

How could the rumor mill whisper about it? For me, it makes more sense to say "the rumor mill was producing/working on it." But do my versions highlighted in green sound right and idiomatic to you?

Hi Angliholic

The idiomatic phrase "the rumor mill" means the people and the process by which a rumor is spread. (I'm not sure whether it is primarily used in AmE or not.) I used the word 'whispering' since that is often how people speak when they are busy spreading a rumor. If I wanted to use a more "mechanical-sounding" word, I might say "was cranking (the rumor) out".
Thanks, Amy.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?