In the last week or so I have heard several times the phrase "safe home" used in lieu of "get home safe". As far as I can recall, I had never heard this before. Is this a new usage?

Mike Nitabach
In the last week or so I have heard several times the phrase "safe home" used in lieu of "get home safe". As far as I can recall, I had never heard this before. Is this a new usage? Mike Nitabach

It's been around for quite some time. It's used in North America but I once read it had English origins (i.e it originated in England.)

I started to use it a couple of years ago when seeing friends off it's a little more poetic and comfortable-sounding than "Get home safely" or "Drive safely" I think.
Cheers, Sage
In the last week or so I have heard several times the phrase "safe home" used in lieu of "get home safe". As far as I can recall, I had never heard this before. Is this a new usage?

I've heard it from only one person, who's Northern Ireland born and resident, and has used it for at least 20 years.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
In the last week or so I have heard several ... had never heard this before. Is this a new usage?

I've heard it from only one person, who's Northern Ireland born and resident, and has used it for at least 20 years.

My forays into Google suggested that it was an Irish expression: "Goodnight, God Bless and Safe Home" by Finbar O'Keefe, is a book about Irish showbands.

Frances Kemmish
Production Manager
East Coast Youth Ballet
www.byramartscenter.com
I've heard it from only one person, who's Northern Ireland born and resident, and has used it for at least 20 years.

My forays into Google suggested that it was an Irish expression: "Goodnight, God Bless and Safe Home" by Finbar O'Keefe, is a book about Irish showbands.

Then it is not at all surprising that two of the three people I heard it from have spent large amounts of time in Irish bars in New York City.
I did of course try to Google up this phrase, but I wasn't able to cull this relevant information from the vast number of pages detailing the numerous dangers of the home and how to eliminate them. What was your search?

Mike Nitabach
My forays into Google suggested that it was an Irish ... Home" by Finbar O'Keefe, is a book about Irish showbands.

Then it is not at all surprising that two of the three people I heard it from have spent large ... vast number of pages detailing the numerous dangers of the home and how to eliminate them. What was your search?

I googled "God bless and safe home", which is what I've heard most often.

Frances Kemmish
Production Manager
East Coast Youth Ballet
www.byramartscenter.com
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Then it is not at all surprising that two of ... home and how to eliminate them. What was your search?

I googled "God bless and safe home", which is what I've heard most often.

I hadn't heard the compound phrase.

Mike Nitabach
In the last week or so I have heard several times the phrase "safe home" used in lieu of "get home safe". As far as I can recall, I had never heard this before. Is this a new usage? Mike Nitabach

Further to this, today's The Globe and Mail, an article (1) has this to say: "As we left Dingle in Kerry, my husband pointed out a sign in Gaelic on the outskirts of the town, and asked me what it meant. "Slán Abhaile," I told him, "means 'safe home'."
The author says it is pronounced "slawn awolya". I thought the "bh" was pronounced as a "v (vee)", but there we are.
Cheers, Sage
(1) "Sailing into the mystic realm of names", Tessa Ryan-Lipp, The Globe and Mail, Facts and Arguments, p. A16, Jan. 20/04)