+0
Could you please show me an example of use of 'same' without 'to' preceding it?
1 2
Comments  
Maybe you mean "the"?
Here, "same" is an adverb: "you get treated fairly, same as any other student in this course!"
(I found it in a book!)
I don't think you can use "same" with e.g. "a", because it always refers to a specific, defined word, situation, etc..., so you'll need the defining article.
But you can use "similar": "a similar situation" sounds good to me...
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Yeah I meant 'the'...lol
My dictionary says it can function as an adj. too; Do you have an idea for this?
Yes, it's mostly used as an adjective, with "the" before...
This is the same story
I've bought the same T-shirt as you
etc, etc...
Ahh here is another question that bothers me:

1) I've bought the same T-shirt as you
2) I've bought the same T-shirt as you
3) I bought the same T-shirt as you did

Which ones are possible?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
To me, they both work, considering 1) and 2) are identical.
3) needs a specification of time in the past, or specification of place.
I prefer 1)...
1) I've bought the same T-shirt as you
2) I've bought the same T-shirt as your
3) I bought the same T-shirt as you did

Now please look at 2 again. Is that OK?
And why can't (3) be just like this? What's the problem in it?

Thanks
1) sounds okay to me.

2) is not right. You could say "I've bought the same T-shirt as yours," but I think it would be better to say "I've bought a t-shirt just like yours."

I guess (3) is okay -- however, for some reason I can't identify, I would prefer "I bought the same T-shirt that you did."

"I bought" and "I've bought" work equally well in any of these.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more