+0
I consider myself to be a good English student. I've always had reading and writings skills that were ranked above average on every reading/writing or general assessment test I've taken.

Except for the New SAT.

In fact, I scored incredibly below the average. When I took the test I was shocked at how little time we had. On one of the English tests they allowed 30 minutes for 39 questions.

That goes against my work habits and basically my life.

I do everything slow from eating, walking to reading. So when I saw the large passages given to me by the SAT, it took me awhile to read. I didn't even come close to finishing the whole test.

What's wrong with me? Is there anything I can do to increase my speed?
+0
I think that you have answered your own question, Wushu:

'That goes against my work habits and basically my life. I do everything slow from eating, walking to reading.'

There's nothing wrong with you, but you'll have to get up to speed. Getting into university is competitive, and one of the basic keys is good marks on the SAT. Get yourself a kitchen timer or similar device and start taking practice exams against the clock. Practice working faster; learn the shortcuts and tricks of test-taking (most SAT/TOEFL/etc. texts have an introductory section on the secrets of test-taking). Practice, practice, practice-- at speed.
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Why does the SAT offer so little time? Does it matter how long the student takes as long as he gets the right answers?

I don't understand why they have to give 30 minutes for 39 questions. In British Columbia, their assessment test offers 2 hours on the English exam and an extra 30 minutes if needed.
Does it matter how long your work takes, as long as you get it done? In most businesses, the answer is 'yes'-- and you will not have your job long if you cannot work to deadlines.

They are a little laid-back in BC. I know: I spent 10 years there, growing moss.


Does it matter how long your work takes, as long as you get it done? In most businesses, the answer is 'yes'-- and you will not have your job long if you cannot work to deadlines.


Not to argue, but I don't know any company that would give extremely rushed deadlines to lose accuracy.

Many companies would rather have accurate, correct work from say...their accountants than have their accountants rush their work, find errors, and delay the project even more.\

Deadlines are often in days, not minutes. For instance, a programmers deadline may be 3 days away. However, he has all the 42 hours he needs to work on his code.

You must admit, the SAT time limit is ridiculous. I've scored high on every assessment test I've had besides this one.

But thanks for your advice and I'll continue reading and working faster with things like timed writes.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?