Yesterday morning on the BBC Radio 4 programme Today (sic!), one of the presenters read out a piece to do with the feeling of satiety. He stumbled a bit on the word, pronouncing it something like "satiate-y", but was quickly corrected by his colleague.
I mention this, not to ridicule the presenter many of us would have been thrown by this word but rather because it's an interesting example of a word somewhere near the limit of most literate native speakers' vocabularies (I would think). There must be quite a sizeable class of words that one recognizes & understands without necessarily being able to pronounce them confidently.
As it happens, the main reason I know how to pronounce "satiety" is that I still remember the surprise with which I heard TS Eliot pronounce it, in his rather donnish voice, in a recorded reading of Ash Wednesday.
Nigel

ScriptMaster language resources (Chinese/Modern & Classical Greek/IPA/Persian/Russian/Turkish):
http://www.elgin.free-online.co.uk
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12
Yesterday morning on the BBC Radio 4 programme Today (sic!), one of the presenters read out a piece to do ... be quite a sizeable class of words that one recognizes & understands without necessarily being able to pronounce them confidently.

A friend of mine recently visited her daughter who is living in the rain forest of Suriname on a research project. When my friend described her arrival in "Para-mara-boo" /"p&r @ 'm&r @ bu/ I realized it was the first time in my life I'd ever heard the name of the country's capital, Paramaribo, spoken aloud. In my head it's always been "Para-maribo" /"p&r @ [email protected] 'ri bo/. I assumed she was pronouncing it correctly for having just been there and having a daughter living there.

I never remember the correct way to say "detritus". I've heard it said twice, two different ways. Similarly for "satiety", as it happens.

I wonder how many people think "awry" is pronounced /'Or i/, or what they make of the verb "prophesy".
< in
I never remember the correct way to say "detritus".

It matches the Latin, which has /i:/: /[email protected]'[email protected]/, in Smith-Trager.

Brian
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I never remember the correct way to say "detritus".

It matches the Latin, which has /i:/: /[email protected]'[email protected]/, in Smith-Trager.

Does the Latin version really have long /i:/?
I thought it was a short one.
pjk
(Email Removed) wrote in
Does the Latin version really have long /i:/? I thought it was a short one.

So far as I can discover, yes.
Brian
Does the Latin version really have long /i:/? I thought it was a short one.

Would have to be /'detritus/ then, no?

am
laurus : rhodophyta : brethoneg : smalltalk : stargate

Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Yesterday morning on the BBC Radio 4 programme Today (sic!), one of the presenters read out a piece to do ... which I heard TS Eliot pronounce it, in his rather donnish voice, in a recorded reading of Ash Wednesday. Nigel

I don't think of satiety as a difficult word at all though I can't say I've ever had cause to actually say it, and can't imagine when I might have heard it. The natural 'best guess' mechanism leaps immediately to piety, sobriety, society etc. The real trip-ups when you're reading unseen text aloud tend to be less sophisticated (from my own experience as a radio presenter) like failing to spot the difference between Donal and Donald and the ever popular foreign words (especially Gaelic, Welsh, and certain African languages)!
Yesterday morning on the BBC Radio 4 programme Today (sic!), ... donnish voice, in a recorded reading of Ash Wednesday. Nigel

I don't think of satiety as a difficult word at all though I can't say I've ever had cause to actually say it, and can't imagine when I might have heard it. The natural 'best guess' mechanism leaps immediately to piety, sobriety, society etc.

But there's interference from "satiate", and from all the words that end in -tion and -tial and -tient and -tious where the "i" has no independent sound.
cotillion but contrition
lenient but sentient
imperial but initial
amphibious but ambitious
I don't think of satiety as a difficult word at ... 'best guess' mechanism leaps immediately to piety, sobriety, society etc.

But there's interference from "satiate", and from all the words that end in -tion and -tial and -tient and -tious where the "i" has no independent sound.

On the other hand, "equation" is usually /I'kweIZn/ although hundreds of analogous words end in /eISn/.
By the way, I noticed the other day that Jay Leno consistently pronounces "illegal" (i:'li:gl) (or possibly ('i:li:gl)). Is this common in the USA?

Regards,
Ekkehard
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more