Recently, I picked up a few English grammar books in a bookstore with the intention of improving my grammar. However, I found that those books were the usual boring way of learning a language. They started with nouns, describing what a noun is and the various form of nouns and e.t.c. I personally find that this kind of teaching method is extremely boring. Why do they tell me what is a predicate and a subject ? Why do they ask me to underline a clause, a phrase, a compound noun, a complex statement in a sentence? Why do they describe to me passive voice, active voice and asking me to identify which group the sentences belong to in their boring exercises?

I want them to tell me why I need to know those. What are the benefits of knowing those and how do I improve my grammar by knowing those. I don't want them to sound so academic as if they themselves don't know why they need to tell me those facts and that they just pass to me what they have learnt from their own boring educational systems. It sounds so academic like teaching history to those average sleepy students......'Class, on 23rd of October, 1917, the American troops in France fire their first shot in trench warfare'. Then in their examination paper, there is a multiple question asking when the first shot was fired by the American troops in France. The students memorise the exact date, answer the question and get 2 marks. So what !? So What if American fired their first shot on 23rd October? Even if they wanted to shoot on 29th December, why do I need to care?!

Surely there must be an interesting way of learning English grammar. Hence I would appreciate if anyone of you in this forum who ever read a good interesting English grammar book, would be kind enough to share with us here.

Thanks.
Oh my God, you got to be far cross with English Grammar. Believe me, it's not that bad yet it's not a piece of cake. Grammar needs much practise and reading . Why don't you attend a course , you see here in the Kingdom there are some specialized institutions where you can find wondeful British and American teachers . Now the set books for such courses are called, Headway for Liz & John Soars, they're just marvellous but you need the help of a teacher to guide you through the process.

p.s. Grammer is something you can't do without as it's the base of any language, now, cheer up and good luck..Emotion: big smile
Hey, that are the books I got here in Italy... Emotion: big smile
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I think online quizzes are a good way of honing your grammatical accuracy. I'm fairly comfortable with English, but some of the tough quizzes end up flummoxing me too.

Try Googling "online quiz" . You'll find lots of stuff.

Cheers,

- Tearsofjoy
Is there any good books on English grammar? I am thinking of self-learning since this would be more convenience then attending a class. In addition, we can always participate in good internet forums such as this to make the learning process more fun.

The question is, is there any book that really tell you why you need to know that bit of thing in grammar rather than telling you what it is. I am looking at the application side of it rather than just knowing it. Most book I browse through appeared to be dry and just factual. I saw a book in amazon.com with the title "Complete Idiot's Guide to Grammar and Style," by Laurie E. Rosakis and also "English Grammar for Dummies," by Geraldine Woods . The reviews on the book were all interesting but I haven't had a look at the book and so cannot personally comment on them.
I like Michael Vince's Grammer books. Have a look at the "Advance Language Practice" by him at a book store. He gives a good summary of the grammer with the basics. Examples are quite good too, and there are some funny cartoons scattered through out the book. There are also very good tests. It may be the right book for, especially if you get one with the key.

Good luck Emotion: smile
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AnonymousIs there any good books on English grammar? I am thinking of self-learning since this would be more convenience then attending a class. In addition, we can always participate in good internet forums such as this to make the learning process more fun.

The question is, is there any book that really tell you why you need to know that bit of thing in grammar rather than telling you what it is. I am looking at the application side of it rather than just knowing it. Most book I browse through appeared to be dry and just factual. I saw a book in amazon.com with the title "Complete Idiot's Guide to Grammar and Style," by Laurie E. Rosakis and also "English Grammar for Dummies," by Geraldine Woods . The reviews on the book were all interesting but I haven't had a look at the book and so cannot personally comment on them.

Check out this site- you may find useful

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/index.html
There is a book entitled "Painless Grammar" which at least has very interesting examples and creative ways of thinking through grammar. Definitely not your typical put you to sleep grammar book.