+0
Can I use:

Gary says that they're going to have to drive instead of fly.

^Can I say this to someone else when Gary told me this in the past but it's still relevant in the present and future? What I don't understand is if when I use the simple present says does it have to be something that's being said in the present(right this instant) or it could just mean that gary has said it....

eg: Gary says that they're going to..etc...(does Gary have to be beside me or on the phone saying what he's saying at the time for me to relay the message using Gary says?)

Or should it be:

Gary has said that they're going to have to drive instead of fly.
+0
PreciousJonesCan I use:

Gary says that they're going to have to drive instead of fly.
Yes, you can use that.
PreciousJonesCan I say this to someone else when Gary told me this in the past but it's still relevant in the present and future?
Yes, you can.
PreciousJoneswhen I use the simple present says does it have to be something that's being said in the present(right this instant)
No. It can refer more generally to the present situation, that is, the topic presently before you.
PreciousJonesdoes Gary have to be beside me or on the phone saying what he's saying at the time for me to relay the message using Gary says?
No.
PreciousJonesshould it be:

Gary has said that they're going to have to drive instead of fly.
No. I would not say that it should be that. You can say that instead, but the original version is just fine.

CJ
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CaliforniaJim,

Thank you so much for your teaching, it completely clears up the questions I had. Emotion: left hug
I'm at the mall waiting for my friend but he hasn't shown up yet, so if I say this:

He said he was going to come.

Does that mean he's still coming or he's no longer going to come.
PreciousJonesDoes that mean he's still coming or he's no longer going to come?
Still coming.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?