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Do the verbs "schlump" and "slump" have anything to do with each other? Any relation there? The origin in Norweigan I'm not familiar with as it would normally signify something “done by random” (randomize) .. I originally saw schlump in a Douglas Coupland novel: “I schlumped back to my room”.

Any ideas .. ?
schlump Definition ☆ schlump (s̸hlump) noun
  1. a person who is stupid, foolish, inept, boring, etc.

  2. one who is sloppily or poorly dressed
intransitive verbSlang to go about lazily, sluggishly, or poorly dressed slump (slŭmp) ntr.v., slumped, slump·ing, slumps.

  1. To fall or sink heavily; collapse: She slumped, exhausted, onto the sofa.

  2. To droop, as in sitting or standing; slouch.


    1. To decline suddenly; fall off: Business slumped after the holidays.

    2. To perform poorly or inadequately: The team has been slumping for a month.

    1. To sink or settle, as into mud or slush.

    2. To slide down or spread out thickly, as mud or fresh concrete.
n.

  1. The act or an instance of slumping.

  2. A drooping or slouching posture: read defeat in the slump of his shoulders.

  3. A sudden falling off or decline, as in activity, prices, or business: a stock market slump; a slump in farm prices.

  4. An extended period of poor performance, especially in a sport or competitive activity: a slump in a batting average.

  5. See grunt (sense 5).
[Probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian slumpa, to slump.] droop (drūp)

v., drooped, droop·ing, droops. v.intr.

  1. To bend or hang downward: “His mouth drooped sadly, pulled down, no doubt, by the plump weight of his jowls” (Gore Vidal).

  2. To bend or sag gradually: flowers drooping in the midday heat.

  3. To sag in dejection or exhaustion: drooped from lack of sleep.
v.tr. To let bend or hang down: “He drooped his body over the rail” (Norman Mailer).n. The act or condition of drooping.[Middle English droupen, from Old Norse drūpa.]
Comments  
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Slump, as you can see, is Scandinavian; schlump's origin: "1950–55, Americanism; prob. of expressive origin". No likely connection. What is your concern about droop?
Could "schlump" be some kind of faux Yiddish? There's schmuck and schlepp - this sounds like it could be a portmanteau of those two.
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Delmobilefaux Yiddish?
That was my first guess. But I think it's real Yiddish.
m-w.com
Main Entry: schlump Pronunciation: \ˈshləmp\ Function:noun Etymology:Yiddish shlump sloppy or dowdy personDate:1948
yourdictionary.com
☆ schlump (s̸hlump)

noun
  1. a person who is stupid, foolish, inept, boring, etc.
  2. one who is sloppily or poorly dressed
intransitive verb
Slang to go about lazily, sluggishly, or poorly dressed

CJ
MoscaDo the verbs "schlump" and "slump" have anything to do with each other? Any relation there?
Hard to say without some research. slump came from a Germanic word schlump, supposedly an imitation of the sound of something falling into water. schlump is Yiddish, but did it originally come from this same idea of the sound of something falling into water? Hard to say. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that there is some relationship.

CJ
Really interesting - this is of special interest to me as I'm scandinavian - and I keep coming across words (often in Couplands novels) which I think are examples of a kind of casual vocabulary - that I've never heard before in english but which sound kind of scandinavian to me.

The example above of the sound immitating 'falling into water' verb appears in a norweigan dicitionary as does the "walk sluggishly, slowly, heavily, lazily".

I don't know Yiddish but it sure seems to be very similar to german (which also is close to our languages).

The "sch-" is very german to us - although it certainly appears in many of our words - on the other hand typically a lot of german words with sch- has been replaced by just s- in many german words adopted by our languages. (I say "our" languages although I'm swedish - they are mutually intelligible to us - in most cases)..
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MoscaI don't know Yiddish but it sure seems to be very similar to german
Yes. It may be considered either a dialect of German, or, according to others, a separate language. It is essentially German to which Hebrew and even some Slavic words have been added. It is written in Hebrew characters.
MoscaThe "sch-" is very german to us
To us, too. But German "sch" often becomes "sh" in English. "schl" becomes "sl". Note how German "f" often becomes English "p".
Schaf - sheep; Schaft - shaft; Scham - shame; scharf - sharp; scheinen - shine; scheu - shy; Schiff - ship; Schild - shield; Schlaf - sleep; Schleim - slime.
Just to name a few.
CJ
CalifJimIt is essentially German to which Hebrew and even some Slavic words have been added. It is written in Hebrew characters.

Hebrew characters? I've seen a LOT of Yiddish peppered through dialogue in my life, but never in Hebrew. Of course, usually foreign words get their phoenetic spelling in English, but this one stuck me as odd.
Odd, but true.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yiddish

Note that there a few images in the right margin that show Yiddish as it is actually written.
CJ
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