Ian Rankin, in Fleshmarket Alley (2004) repeatedly uses the spelling "whiskey" in reference to Scotch. Is this an accepted spelling in Scotland? (The action takes place in Edinburg, and the spelling is otherwise standard British although the book is an American edition.)

Pierre

Pierre Jelenc > New on Home Office Records: Ethan Lipton
1 2 3
Ian Rankin, in Fleshmarket Alley (2004) repeatedly uses the spelling "whiskey" in reference to Scotch. Is this an accepted spelling in Scotland? (The action takes place in Edinburg, and the spelling is otherwise standard British although the book is an American edition.)

Not as far as I am concerned - I was taught that "whisky" is Scottish and "whiskey" is Irish.
Since your English is so good, I will point out that Edinburgh has an h at the end.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Ian Rankin, in Fleshmarket Alley (2004) repeatedly uses thespelling "whiskey" ... is otherwise standard British although the book is an Americanedition.)

Not as far as I am concerned - I was taught that "whisky" isScottish and "whiskey" is Irish.

That's the rule of thumb which will see one through almost all usquebaugh eventualitites, but it's never been a hard and fast rule either way.
(Remember the Molesworth master captioned "Usque ad nauseam"?)

Mike.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Ian Rankin, in Fleshmarket Alley (2004) repeatedly uses the spelling ... otherwise standard British although the book is an American edition.)

Not as far as I am concerned - I was taught that "whisky" is Scottish and "whiskey" is Irish. Since your English is so good, I will point out that Edinburgh has an h at the end.

As does Williamsburgh not that M. Jelenc cares, since he's two bodies of water to the west.
Ian Rankin, in Fleshmarket Alley (2004) repeatedly uses the spelling "whiskey" in reference to Scotch. Is this an accepted spelling in Scotland? (The action takes place in Edinburg, and the spelling is otherwise standard British although the book is an American edition.)

From the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary under "whisky":
The Irish and US product is now usu. spelt whiskey.
Since your English is so good, I will point out that Edinburgh has an h at the end.

Arrgh. Stupid Powerbook keyboard was dropping half its Ps, now it's dropping Hs.
(I even knew a Scot who pronounced the "gh"!)
Pierre

Pierre Jelenc > New on Home Office Records: Ethan Lipton
Try out our live chat room.
From the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary under "whisky": The Irish and US product is now usu. spelt whiskey.

Well, yes, but it's the reverse I'm wondering about. The author and the narrator are firmly Scottish, the setting is entirely Scottish, and the whisky is Lagavulin.
Pierre

Pierre Jelenc > New on Home Office Records: Ethan Lipton
From the New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary under "whisky": The Irish and US product is now usu. spelt whiskey.

Well, yes, but it's the reverse I'm wondering about. The author and the narrator are firmly Scottish, the setting is entirely Scottish, and the whisky is Lagavulin.

As I said earlier, there isn't a hard and fast rule either way: what we're told is simply the usual practice.

Mike.
Since your English is so good, I will point out that Edinburgh has an h at the end.

Arrgh. Stupid Powerbook keyboard was dropping half its Ps, now it's dropping Hs.

Pretensions of grandeur, has it?

David
==
replace usenet with the
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more