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I am not sure about the words in red. Please proofread the passage and correct them if they are wrongly used:

“Long time no see” is a very interesting sentence. When I first read this sentence from an American friend’s email, I laughed. I thought it was a perfect example of Chinglish.

Obviously, it is a word-by-word translation of the Chinese greeting with a ruined English grammar and structure! Later on my friend told me that it is a standard American greeting. I was too astonished to believe her. Therefore, I did a research on google.com. To my surprise, there are over 60 thousand web pages containing “long time no see”. This sentence has been widely used in emails, letters, newspapers, movies, books, or any other possible place. Though it is informal, it is part of the language that Americans use daily. Ironically (具有讽刺意味地), if you type this phrase in Microsoft Word, the software will tell you that the grammar needs to be corrected.

Nobody knows the origin of this Chinglish sentence. Some people believe that it came from Charlie Chan’s movies. In the 1930s, moviemakers successfully created a worldwide famous Chinese detective named Charlie Chan. Detective Chan likes to teach Americans some Chinese wisdom by quoting (引用) Confucius (孔子). “Long time no see” was his trademark. Soon this phrase became popular in the real world.

Some people refer as a huge pot of stew. All kinds of culture are mixed in the stew together, and they change the color and taste of each other. American Chinese, though a minority ethnic group in the , is also contributing some changes to the stew! Language is usually the first thing to be influenced (影响) in the mixed stew.

You can have some other examples, such as pizza from Italian, susi from Japanese, and déjà vu from French etc. There is a long list! Americans do not just simply borrow something from others. They will change it and make it their own, so you would not be surprised to find a tofu and peanut butter hamburger in a restaurant, or to buy a bottle of iced Chinese green tea with honey in a store. Since Americans appreciate Chinese culture more and more nowadays, I believe more Chinese words will become American English in the future. In this way, the American stew keeps adding richness and flavor.

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This is really good.
wangqh2696122 I am not sure about the words in red. Please proofread the passage and correct them if they are wrongly used:
“Long time no see” is a very interesting sentence. When I first read this sentence from an American friend’s email, I laughed. I thought it was a perfect example of Chinglish.
Obviously, it is a word-by-word translation of the Chinese greeting with a ruined English grammar and structure! Later on my friend told me that it is a standard American greeting. I was too astonished to believe her. So, I googled it. To my surprise, there are over 60 thousand Web pages containing “long time no see”. This sentence has been widely used in emails, letters, newspapers, movies, books, or any other possible place. Though it is informal, it is part of the language that Americans use daily. Ironically (具有讽刺意味地), if you type this phrase in Microsoft Word, the software will tell you that the grammar needs to be corrected.
Nobody knows the origin of this Chinglish sentence. Some people believe that it came from Charlie Chan movies. In the 1930s, Hollywood moviemakers successfully created a world-famous Chinese detective named Charlie Chan. Detective Chan likes [since they are no longer making them, I'd say "liked."] to teach Americans [deleted "some"] Chinese wisdom by quoting (引用) Confucius (孔子). “Long time no see” was his trademark. Soon this phrase became popular in the real world.
Some people refer America as a melting pot, but I prefer to think of it as a huge pot of stew. All kinds of culture are mixed in the stew together, and they change the color and taste of each other. American Chinese, though a minority ethnic group in the USA, is also contributing some changes to the stew! Language is usually the first thing to be influenced (影响) in the mixed stew.
You can have some other examples, such as pizza from Italian, susi from Japanese, and déjà vu from French etc. There is a long list! Americans do not just simply borrow something from others. They will change it and make it their own, so you would not be surprised to find a tofu and peanut butter hamburger in a restaurant [gag! really?? is there not another example you could use?] , or to buy a bottle of iced Chinese green tea with honey in a store. Since Americans appreciate Chinese culture more and more nowadays, I believe more Chinese words will become American English in the future. In this way, the American stew keeps adding richness and flavor.
I really like your stew metaphor, but America is often called the great melting pot, so I edited to include that. Nice essay!
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Thanks!