+1
I work in a restaurant. When letting a server know that he or she has a new customer, I'll say something to the effect of, "Hey Joe, I seated table 40," or "Table 40 has been seated."

My co-workers constantly argue that it should be 'sat,' not 'seated' in both cases. I just don't see how this could be correct.

Can anyone let me know which is correct, and why?

Thank you!
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I am FAR more familiar with "have seated."

They are confusing the intranstive verb, "to sit" with the transitive verb "to seat."

"Sat" is not a transitive verb. I am sitting here. I sat there yesterday. The only person doing the "seating" in this case is me.

But in your context, "to seat" is the right word. You are providing a place for someone else to sit.

This theater seats 600. This car comfortably seats 5. The speaker will begin after everyone has been seated.

Stick to your guns.
Grammar GeekI am FAR more familiar with "have seated."

They are confusing the intranstive verb, "to sit" with the transitive verb "to seat."

"Sat" is not a transitive verb. I am sitting here. I sat there yesterday. The only person doing the "seating" in this case is me.

But in your context, "to seat" is the right word. You are providing a place for someone else to sit.

This theater seats 600. This car comfortably seats 5. The speaker will begin after everyone has been seated.

Stick to your guns.
And don't be afraid to quote G.G. (or me, for that matter, who agrees).
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I agree with GG and Philip. As GG said, "Stick to your guns".

Here is a link to the American Heritage Dictionary entry for the word seat, which will further back you up:
http://www.bartleby.com/61/60/S0196000.html

Now you can also quote the dictionary definitions for the transitive verb to seat. Emotion: big smile
I work in a restaurant, too. Server slang is horrendous. I have experience as an English teacher, I'm studying for my graduate degree in English lit, and I'm notorious for using proper English no matter where I am or what the context. I don't often correct my co-workers, who would probably just roll their eyes and continue speaking the same way, but I completely understand why you could become confused in such an environment.
I had the exact same problem. I said "I seated some people at table 42" and my boss was like "you don't say I seated, you say I sat." Now I get to rub in her face and be like "hey, uh, so should be change that sign to 'please wait to be sat' or just leave it the 'incorrect' way. Thanks for this. I feel so correct now. :-D
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The advisability of rubbing anyone's boss's face in anything is questionable, but I do think the idea of temporarily (before the restaurant opens) taping a sign that says "Please wait to be sat" over your regular sign (or just "sat" over the word "seated") is hilarious.
Your co-worker is wrong! Sat is the past simple and past participle of the verb "to sit", which implies an action that only the subject can do on itself, nobody else but the subject of the sentence. So, you sat a customer on table 40, for example, is totally wrong, as one only sits oneself! However, I seated the customer, as you said, is right, because you are using the verb "to seat" as a transtive verb to indicate that you are the one who actually seated somebody else (took somebody to their seat). Sit can only be used against yourself, you sit on a chair, for instance. You simply cannot "sit somebody on a chair"! Therefore, in past form, they cannot be "sat" by you.

Basically seated and sat are from different verbs: the first one is "to sit" and the other one is "to seat"; just think of them like this: to sit oneself; to be seated.

I hate it when I hear people say "I was sat there"... it's ridiculous! You either say "I sat there", or you say "I was seated there". It's actually very simple when you think about it, people tend to hear these errors and they get stuck in their brains and become normal discourse.. let's protect the English language!!
I'm in the same situation, and I have a manager that refuses to acknowledge a sentence that uses the word "seated," insisting that his GED knows better than my writing degree. It is "seated," not "sat," and I'm glad this forum seems to agree with me.
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