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Hi,

Are second 'AREs' necessary?

They are less likely to be happy than are others.

They are less likely to be happy than are other career-minded people.
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No, you don't need the second 'are's
Hi,

There is no need for the second are's.
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Leave AREs out.
Believer
Hi,

Are second 'AREs' necessary?

They are less likely to be happy than are others. ( They are less likely to be happier than others. )

They are less likely to be happy than are other career-minded people. ( They are less likely to be happier than other career-minded people.)
I don't agree with the change to "happier."

Someone is happy or not happy. Group A is less likely to call themselves "happy" than the people in Group B.

It's not necessary that they say they are happier than Group B, unless on a scale of 1-10, the B people said they were an 8 and the A people are 7 - happy, but not happier than the people in B.
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Hi Barbara

They are less likely to be happy than are others. ( They are less likely to be happier than others. )

They are less likely to be happy than are other career-minded people. ( They are less likely to be happier than other career-minded people.)

The other members agree that 'are' is not needed. With 'than' in the sentence, it should be happier than, shouldn't it? IMO, 'happy than' is not correct.
No, not in my opinion.

They are less likely to be happy than the other people (implied are).

It's not "happier than they are" but their group is "less likely to be happy" "than the other people are."
Howdy Englishforeros,
here are some examples that I made up.

In these you can't take away more or less, because they are part of the comparative:
They are more [inclined to agree] than the other politicians.
They are less [likely to be happy] than the others.

In these you can take away less because it just modifies likely. The comparative is happier than:
They are [less likely to be] happier than the others.
They are [not likely to be] happier than the others.
They are [likely to be] happier than the others.
They are happier than the others.

This is the same as the last example, but it's interpreted another way. The main comparative is less... than, which contains another comparative, happier. Note that there's some important context missing: happier than who? (...than Jenny). It is a pretty complex kind of example:
They are less [likely to be happier] than the others.
They are less [likely to be happier (than Jenny)] than the others.

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