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This is a repost,just want to have other opinions about my queries.Emotion: smile

Don't ask for time, ask for hunger.

Does it make sense? My friend has this as his status message in an online chatroom in our country, but I don't understand why he has to say "ask for hunger".

If it makes sense,what does he mean?

Thanks guys!!!

And one more thing.

She'll be extremely punished.

or

She'll extremely be punished.

Are both sentences correct?

Any difference?

Thanks again!!!
Comments  
alda1119This is a repost,just want to have other opinions about my queries.

Don't ask for time, ask for hunger Are you sure it's supposed to make sense?
Just as a wild guess, suppose he's talking about asking for volunteers to spend time helping poor people. You're not really helping until you've suffered. Crazy, Hmmmm?

Does it make sense? My friend has this as his status message in an online chatroom in our country, but I don't understand why he has to say "ask for hunger".

If it makes sense,what does he mean?

She'll be extremely punished.

or

She'll extremely be punished. This is not used. But you may say, "She'll be punished extremely."

Are both sentences correct?

Any difference?

alda1119Don't ask for time, ask for hunger.

Does it make sense?
No. Not to me.
alda1119She'll be extremely punished.

or

She'll extremely be punished.

Are both sentences correct?
Neither is correct. Use this: She'll be severely punished. Or this: She'll be punished severely. (It's more idiomatic to use severely with punishments.)

CJ
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Hi, Jim,
I agree completely on the adverbs - at least to the point that I would never use "extremely" in that situation. But how would you explain it to someone? (I wouldn't have called it "incorrect.")

Isn't there a noun or adjective describing the frequency with which two words appear in conjunction with one another? I can't think of it. Seems like I've heard it used on the site.

As in the case of "punished," she could be: rewarded, well rewarded, extremely well rewarded, but not extremely rewarded. Is it true of all past participles?
I can see it's not true of present participles. "The trip was extremely rewarding/punishing."

Looking for past participles which seem to go well with "extremely," I found among the A's and B's:
admired, amused, annoyed, appreciated, attracted, bleached, blessed, blinded, blotted, blushed, bored, bowed, bruised, burned, buzzed.
These all seem to describe a condition rather than a process. The only one I found which challenged "punished" was "bounced." "During our bus ride in the country, we were extremly bounced [around]." I know "severely" works better, but "extremely" seems at least acceptable.
AvangiIsn't there a noun or adjective describing the frequency with which two words appear in conjunction with one another? I can't think of it. Seems like I've heard it used on the site.
Are you thinking of "collocation", maybe?
AvangiLooking for past participles which seem to go well with "extremely," I found among the A's and B's:
admired, amused, annoyed, appreciated, attracted, bleached, blessed, blinded, blotted, blushed, bored, bowed, bruised, burned, buzzed.
My take on it is as follows: extremely, like very, goes with adjectives, not verbs. The participles you list are basically those which can act as adjectives. [extremely / very / somewhat] [bored / annoyed] are central examples of the sort of thing I'm referring to. punished, on the other hand, is not used adjectivally. If I say I am punished, I don't describe myself in the same way as when I say I am interested. Instead, I interpret am punished as a verb in passive voice. I am talking about something that happens regularly to me. Similarly anomalous are extremely condemned, extremely pardoned, extremely excused, extremely snubbed, extremely complimented, and extremely thanked.

CJ
Why don't you ask your friend what it means?
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Hi khoff! I already did. he couldn't tell me. haha!

Thanks Jim and A!
CalifJim[]Are you thinking of "collocation", maybe?
Possibly so, although I've lately come to think of that term more as describing a "fixed expression."
If it's also used as an uncountable, that's probably the ticket.

Thanks for the info. I really appreciate the careful attention. - A.