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2/ Where the first part is still true

If I could speak Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated. - Does this necessarily mean I can't speak Spanish now? Can I use this one even if could speak it?

If I had been able to Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated. - This doesn't necessarily mean that I can speak Spanish now, does it? It just tells us that I couldn't speak it at some point in the past.
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Can I use 'were' instead of 'had been' in third conditional? As in:

If I were there yesterday, I wouldn't have done it.

If I went to bed, I wouldn't have met you.
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Comments  
If I could speak Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated. - Does this necessarily mean I can't speak Spanish now? -- Yes.
Can I use this one even if could speak it?-- No.
If I had been able to Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated. - This doesn't necessarily mean that I can speak Spanish now, does it? It just tells us that I couldn't speak it at some point in the past. -- Right
Can I use 'were' instead of 'had been' in third conditional?-- No.
If I had been able to Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated. - This only tells us that I couldn't speak it in the past? I may or may not be able to speak it now, in the present? It depends on the context? Can I use this version 'If I had been able to speak Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated' even if it's a general fact that I CANNOT speak Spanish?

Having read your last answer I've come to the conclusion that sentences like this one are incorrect:

If I were there yesterday, I wouldn't have done it. - What do you think?
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My chest wouldn't hurt now if I hadn't waxed it.
My chest wouldn't hurt now if I didn't wax it. - Is this sentence correct? Can I replace 'hadn't' with 'didn't'?
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Can I use this version 'If I had been able to speak Spanish, I wouldn't have needed to get the letter translated' even if it's a general fact that I CANNOT speak Spanish?-- Yes, of course—or if it's a secret—or if you've started Spanish classes recently—or if you are a fluent Spanish speaker now—or in any situation whatsoever in which you could not speak Spanish then.

If I were there yesterday, I wouldn't have done it. - What do you think?-- I believe I have already given you my thoughts on that. I shan't type it again.

My chest wouldn't hurt now if I hadn't waxed it.-- Wax it in the past.
My chest wouldn't hurt now if I didn't wax it. -- Wax it generally speaking

I see that your 'Bon voyage' from EF lasted all of 6 hours. A change of heart?
Do you prefer versions with second/third conditional when a general fact is that you couldn't and still can't do something?
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Here's one part of a situation that I heard in a tv-show. There was this girl named Elena. And she thought that her boyfriend wasn't gone(I don't mean geographically, however I'm sure you understand).

If he was gone he wouldn't have called. - Did she use second/third conditional because she was sure that her lovely boyfriend wasn't gone?
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Mister MicawberI see that your 'Bon voyage' from EF lasted all of 6 hours. A change of heart?
How did you know? How am I so predictable? You must have been able to see my IP adress.
Speaking of which..."How did you know it was me" or "How do you know it's me", which one is better?

Also, "I was mean to you" and "I was being mean to you"
"I was sarcastic" and "I was being sarcastic"
What are the differences between these?
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If I were explaining a situation that happened in the past and wanted to ask you about something, I'd put it this was:

What did she mean by(something)? Is "what does she mean" also acceptable and completely the same?
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Do you prefer versions with second/third conditional when a general fact is that you couldn't and still can't do something?-- Examples, please.

If he was gone he wouldn't have called. - Did she use second/third conditional because she was sure that her lovely boyfriend wasn't gone?-- If she were sure, she would have used 'were', not 'was'.
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Mister MicawberI see that your 'Bon voyage' from EF lasted all of 6 hours. A change of heart?
IP and style, not necessarily in that order.

Speaking of which..."How did you know it was me" or "How do you know it's me", which one is better?-- The first: regression with the main verb.

Also, "I was mean to you" and "I was being mean to you";"I was sarcastic" and "I was being sarcastic".What are the differences between these?-- The second emphasizes the duration, the 'action', and therefore probably indicates heightened emotion in the speaker.

What did she mean by (something)? Is "what does she mean" also acceptable and completely the same?-- It depends in part on whether she died, etc., in the interval.
Mister MicawberWhat did she mean by (something)? Is "what does she mean" also acceptable and completely the same?-- It depends in part on whether she died, etc., in the interval.
What if she hasn't died? Would then "what does she mean by(something)" be correct?

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The last question!

If you hadn't told me you were 13, I would've thought you were 16.
If you hadn't told me you were 13, I would think you are 16.
I want to emphasize that I still think she is 16 even thought she did tell me she was 13. Which one do I use? I've read that the first one might be talking about what I think now, or about what I thought BETWEEN BEING told and now? Is that true?

And, which one would you use if you were me?
What if she hasn't died? Would then "what does she mean by(something)" be correct?-- Stick with the regressed form unless she is very immediate to the context.

If you hadn't told me you were 13, I would've thought you were 16.
If you hadn't told me you were 13, I would think you are 16.
I want to emphasize that I still think she is 16 even thought she did tell me she was 13. Which one do I use? - If you still think she is 16, then you can use neither. Both say that you now believe she is not 16.

I've read that the first one might be talking about what I think now, or about what I thought BETWEEN BEING told and now? Is that true?-- The first refers to a past thought; the second refers to a present thought

And, which one would you use if you were me?- It depends on what thinking period I was referring to.
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