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hi guys
I am Cuneyt from Turkey
As far as i know from what my teachers taught me that the verb see is non-action verb and therefore cannot be used in progressive tenses only one exception in which means -appointment-as in this example

I am seeing the doctor tomorrow( appointment)

but in its real meaning ie: I see the children in the garden now ( we cant use progressive form because its non-progressive verb.........

BUT I see most examples from movies and the documentaries ,anyway.. the english speking people use "see" in the progressive tenses....

Can you clarify me here please.........
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but in its real meaning ie: I see the children in the garden now ( we cant use progressive form because its non-progressive verb.........

BUT I see most examples from movies and the documentaries ,anyway.. the english speking people use "see" in the progressive tenses....

Can you clarify THIS FOR me here please.........

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In the normal neutral meaning we tend not to put these types of verbs; see, smell, taste, in the progressive. Though we ENLs do largely tend ['tend' is the operative word] to stick with the present simple style, the meaning is a progressive one.

What you're seeing in movies and documentaries [= what is occurring for you] are meanings that are more nuanced than the normal neutral.

"I'm hearing something that I doooon't like."

If you could give us some examples and their context, that would help a great deal.
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Hi JTT
''I have been wanting it for a long time.'' I tought that we can't use WANT in progressive form either and dictionary says not usually in progressive. I'm confused.
Hi JTT
''I have been wanting it for a long time.'' I thought that we can't use WANT in progressive form either and dictionary says not usually in progressive. I'm confused.

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I hear you, Salam. {notice 'hear' not 'hearing'}

Context is everything. We have to know the context, the situation, the meaning the speaker intends. And "not usually" are the important words. Forget the advice that states, "can't use".

Googled: I hear - 9,680,000 hits -->> I'm hearing - 257,000 hits

That's not "not usually", that's "almost never".Emotion: wink

Student: [wants a pencil] Mrs Blodscrog, I am wanting a pencil. * [* denotes ungrammatical]

Student: [wants a pencil] Mrs Blodscrog, I want a pencil.

In situations like this, we ENLs view this as a STATE, in this case 'the state of wanting' and so, as a result, 'want' is INVARIABLY chosen.

Now, we use the present perfect continuous, as in your example,

''I have been wanting it for a long time.'' ,

to show that this 'state of wanting' has been ongoing and possibly, it shows a deeper 'want'.

Try some more Google Advanced Searches to see the frequency of just how these state verbs are used.

I smell - 500,000 -->>> I'm smelling - 6920

There is one there under this verb, smell that shows why we sometimes use state verbs in the progressive; they carry a nuanced meaning.

"I'm smelling Oscar!"

This gives the feeling, obviously in a figurative sense, that the speaker senses a very good chance that someone/something will win an Oscar.