Which is correct?

1) I'm going to see a movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

2) I'm going to watch a movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

3) I saw a movie "Roman Holiday" on TV.

4) I watched a movie "Roman Holiday" on TV.
Both see and watch are acceptable.

However, you have the incorrect article in each of your sentences.

1) I'm going to see the movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

2) I'm going to watch the movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

3) I saw the movie "Roman Holiday" on TV.

4) I watched the movie "Roman Holiday" on TV.
Thank you!

So both see and watch are okay!

Articles are difficult to me. ;(

But I see how to use an article in this case.

I'll watch from now on!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yes, articles can be difficult. One thing that will help is to remember that we label them definite and indefinite. You are planning to see/watch a specific movie, so the definite article is appropriate.

I generally use see for a theater event, and watch for an at-home event. I don't think this is a rule, but I find it to be a very common distinction.

Interesting: I'm picking up "Roman Holiday" from the library today and plan to watch it tonight at home. While watching a TV article about Audrey Hepburn, I realized that I had never (probably) seen it. So, instead of seeing it as a teen, I'll watch it as a 67-year-old.
I agree with Philip.

1) I'm going to see the movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

2) I'm going to watch the movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater)

"I'm going to see the movie "Roman Holiday" with my friend. (at a theater). I am not at the theater yet. I am going there to see the movie.

Once I am in the theater, I would say "I am watching the movie."
PhilipI'm picking up "Roman Holiday" from the library today and plan to watch it tonight at home.
Wonderful film. Let us know later how you liked it. Emotion: smile

I wonder if the difference isn't related to the difference between 'going to', the verb of motion, and 'going to' the periphrastic future.

I'm going (motion to the theatre) [in order] to see the movie.

I'm going to (periphrastic future) to watch the movie. (I'm already home. I'm not going anywhere.)

Or maybe not.

CJ
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Thank you, everyone!

I think I understand how to use the difinite article.

So, it's better to use "see" when I go to the movies.

To Mr.Philip

Were you going to watch "Roman Holiday"?

That's nice!

I hope you love it.

Well, I just picked up this title for practice, not really going to watch it.

But I love this film and I've seen it on a screen before.

Maybe I was lucky I could see it at a theater. Emotion: smile

To Mr.CalifJim

Hi! Do you love the film, too?

I really was not to watch "Roman Holiday" but I love it and I have the (a?) DVD.

So I can watch it whenever I want. Emotion: smile
To Mr.Philip



Were you going to watch "Roman Holiday"?

That's nice!

I hope you love it.

I found it quite charming. Impressive that Audrey Hepburn got the Oscar for her first movie!

It just isn't the type of film that a nine-year-old boy would be interested in. Now I'm 67 and loved it.