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1. Have you ever seen a Korean movie?
2. Have you ever watched a Korean movie?
3. Have you ever seen a Korean TV program?
4. Have you ever watched a Korean TV program?
Which of the sentences are not acceptable?
Thank you very much for your reply.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
[duplicate post]
 khoff's reply was promoted to an answer.
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They're both fine in BrE too – in different contexts, as Khoff says.

I'm not sure why Swan should state that one is incorrect. Is there any explanation in the book?

MrP
Swan's explanation is as follows:

Watch is typically used to talk about experiences that are going on, in progress.

We often prefer see to talk about the whole of a performance, play, cinema film, match etc.

Compare:

He got into a fight yesterday afternoon while he was watching a football match. (NOT ... while he was seeing a football match.)

Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"? (NOT Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"?)
Thanks, Teo!

Swan takes a very strange position here. You can say:

1. I watched tv last night.

2. "What have you been doing?" "I've been watching the football, on tv."

3. I've just watched every film of Greta Garbo's from beginning to end; and I can categorically state that nowhere does she say "I want to be alone".

And they're all correct!

MrP
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Teo1. Have you ever seen a Korean movie?
2. Have you ever watched a Korean movie?
3. Have you ever seen a Korean TV program?
4. Have you ever watched a Korean TV program?
Which of the sentences are not acceptable?
Thank you very much for your reply.

There are several ways one can compare the two words, some of which overlap.

1. Fact versus intent: "I saw an eagle overhead; while I was watching it fly around, I saw many smaller birds fleee from the area".

2. I find myself using the two words to distinguish between seeing a movie in a theater or watching it at home. However, this is not a clearly defined distinction because of the generic use of "see".

Just something else to consider.....not meant to be an exhaustive explanation of the differences. Hope it adds some light.

When talking about a film, I would say "watch" only states the "action", whereas "see" implies that you remember most of it. Let's say someone invites me to the movies; I can say "Oh no, thanks, but I saw it 2 weeks ago". I wouldn't say "I watched it 2 weeks ago".

On the other hand, when talking for ex. of the eagle, you "watch" it, meaning you're focused on it, but in your peripheral vision, you "see" other birds.
If memory serves, the following reply was written by CalifJim.

I watch/?see movies often.
I'm watching/*seeing television.
I like to watch/?see movies.
I was watching/*seeing the movie.
I watched/saw the movie.
I have watched/seen that movie.
I have been watching/*seeing movies since I was 5 years old.
I'll watch/*see that movie with you.
That's a movie I won't be watching/seeing again!
Would you like to watch/see the play?
Would you like to watch/see a baseball game?

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"There are no facts, only interpretations" - Nietzsche
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I've just realized you'll use "see" in a future or past tense: "I've just seen a movie"/"I've already seen that movie"/"I saw a movie last week..."/"Have you seen XYZ?" - "No, I'm going to see it tomorrow". You're not going to say "I'm seeing a movie", you'll say "I'm watching a movie". (Answer to the question: "What are you doing?")

Oh well, this may and probably is quite irrelevant...
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