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I would like to seek someone's explanation of the grammar for the following sentence.

I don't understand whether the word "supply" is a verb or not.

The energy that the pump must supply is the friction energy plus the elevation energy.

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Ben9108I don't understand whether the word "supply" is a verb or not.

It's a verb. Only a verb can follow a modal auxiliary like 'must'.

CJ

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Thanks for your reply

I don't understand why the sentence has two words. Would you mind letting me know the reason?

The energy [that the pump must supply] is the friction energy plus the elevation energy.

Ben9108I don't understand why the sentence has two words.

It doesn't have two words. It has 15 words. I think you meant verbs. It has two verbs (must, supply) plus another one (is) later.

Verbs occur in groups. You can have more than one verb in a verb phrase. All except the last verb are called auxiliary verbs. There is a verb phrase (one or more verbs) in each clause. "must supply" occurs in one clause, and "is" occurs in another clause. The bracketed clause is called a relative clause. It modifies the preceding noun phrase "the energy".

In your sentence 'must' is an auxiliary verb. It indicates obligation.

CJ

Thanks for your reply

Hoping you make comments on the following rewritten sentence at your convenience. Thanks

The energy, that the pump must supply, is the friction energy plus the elevation energy.

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Ben9108The energy [no comma] that the pump must supply [no comma] is the friction energy plus the elevation energy.

In English we do not put commas around a that-clause.

CJ