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hi.
this is my first post here and this forum is very helpful. Here I already found a lot of answers to questions I had had.

Now, I have two other questions.

1. i often saw sentecnes like: they seemed not to .... i was wondering if this wasnt wrong? doesnt it have to be: they didnt seem to ...?

2. the meaning of the word amazing is fairly unclear to me. however, i do know that it means that something is very surprising. but does it mean something positive at the same time? for example if i say: that was amazing. does it just mean that it was surprising or does it mean that it was great , exceeltnet, fantastic at the same time? can sth amazing be negative. for example can an amazing experience be negative because you have never expected something to be that terrible? for example, if i go to Afirca and see all the misery i didnt expect? is that amazing?

i also have another question. dont want to open three threads. thats wh i put it all in one thread. i hope its ok.
this question is hard to describe. in german and french wie have a word called: man ( german) and on ( french)

according to dictionaries man and on mean "you" . however i have the impression that "you" is not always appropriate. i have the feeling that its often better to say people or ro use a passive voice instead. cant think of any example, but maybe there is some1 here who can speak german or french and is an english native at the same time. an example of you would be : you never know. a formal way to say it would be "one".

i hope u understand what i mean.

regards. ( i often see that u dont write anything at the end of a post. why is that so? is that rather unusual? mostly, in german froums, people write regards or something like that)
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On the other hand, many people sign their first names at the end, Anon.

1-- Seemed not to = did not seem to. We tend to front the negation, but I think it is not really required (= I don't think it is really required). Perhaps others will appear with a Rule.

2-- Amazing is used like wonderful, terrific, etc, and normally signals a positive sentiment. You would have to use amazingly bad, as in It was an amazingly bad movie.... but then, bad now also sometimes means good, and amazing may change in the future as well.

3-- My German is far better than my French, but in either country I would starve to death under a bridge if I were limited to those languages. Nevertheless, I do recall that the standard translations of man and on are you (informal) and one (formal)-- and they seemed to work well enough to get me through my college translation exercises, while making sense. Passive voice I don't think enters into the problem unless the semantics of the context otherwise demand it.
Welcome to the forum, Anonymous,

(If you'd like to return, create a name for yourself, and sign in. Unless you'd like to remain anonymous.)

On 'amazing'-- Yes, it is technically a word with an open meaning in relation to positive or negative feelings of excitement. Calling something 'amazing', and leaving it at that, is not a comprehensive expression.

The forum does not require formal letter-writing protocols.
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i also have another question. dont want to open three threads. thats wh i put it all in one thread. i hope its ok.
this question is hard to describe. in german and french wie have a word called: man ( german) and on ( french)

according to dictionaries man and on mean "you" . however i have the impression that "you" is not always appropriate. i have the feeling that its often better to say people or ro use a passive voice instead. cant think of any example, but maybe there is some1 here who can speak german or french and is an english native at the same time. an example of you would be : you never know. a formal way to say it would be "one".

Yes, you are right about "on" and "man". These can be used in any circumstance you need them.

English is more choosy.

"we" is used any time you are enclosed in the group: "we're going to buy a new car"

"they" is used when you are thinking of a particular group etc... "In England they drink lots of tea"

"you" is used for example when correcting children "You mustn't use such words!"

"one" is more formal "one never knows", used for example in proverbs.

The passive voice is used when the "active party" is not being focused on, is not important: "English is spoken in Hong Kong", meaning "people/everybody speak/s English in HK" (I guess it's true)
hi!

fnally, i managed to register. thank you very much for your answers so far.

just in order to make it clear.

if i say the sentence: it was amazing. what do u think at first sight, when not knowig the context? it was awesome? i didnt expect that and it was so awesome. is that what u think or do u just think that it was unexpected and surprisig?

and: are there als any other versb like to seem that can have the not behing and after itsself?

regards and thanks in advance
Hi Globetrotter-- welcome to EF!

1-- Of the following 20 concordances for amazing, only one seems to me to be negative. As Dave says, the word itself is neutral, but I think that usage leans heavily toward the positive side of amazement:

1      colleagues and teachers, was his amazing ability to  produce literary Latin 
2 nly a tenth of them continue". An amazing article in the Manchester Guardian
3 est Berlin. Berlin's resilience is amazing, but if it has to hire its labor i
4 e composition; and that over-all, amazing control of large washes which is t
5 emotions. Sometimes she displays amazing eidetic imagery and seems to see al
6 to dig in for the winter. It is an amazing fact that in some species this wil
7 over rough roads that it seems an amazing feat of endurance for both Miss Pa
8 for a tribal portrait. It was amazing how they had herded together for p
9 provocateurs. I find this view amazing. It is a view which even a minimal
10 ttery of Athens and the Iliad are amazing manifestations of the inherent pote
11 rated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge. In the final month
12 at dusk one evening and beheld an amazing sight. The manservant Devol and his
13 of people ran out to inspect the amazing spectacle of the denuded beach. Man
14 nvariably, "Gentlemen, this is an amazing story! It's bigger than the Armisti
15 rs. I will also be underpaid. The amazing thing is that this too is caused by
16 Perhaps this is a clue to the amazing variety and power of reactions, at
17 eople love to crack tile and it's amazing what beautiful designs they come up
18 ich, thwarting the efforts of her amazing will, ran through her spoken words
19 ver so many areas of need in this amazing world. @ N&C&'s EDITORIAL "Conf
20 ould think of saying was, "You're amazing, you know"? Later, we agreed to th

2-- Many verbs can appear in either structure, I think:

He doesn't appear to be happy / he appears not to be happy
You need not wait / you don't need to wait
He thinks I'm not beautiful / he doesn't think I'm beautiful
I dare not eat a peach / I don't dare to eat a peach

There are different reasons for these-- some are fronted idiomatically, others are semi-modal verbs.

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Welcome Globetrotter,

First, I want to encourage you to proofread your typing before submitting your posts. We have enough work to do managing real errors in English, and not purposeful shortcuts, such as:

-Not capitalizing the first letter of the first word in a sentence.

-Not capitalizing 'I'.

-Shortcuts in spelling, like 'u' for 'you'.

-Various typos that could easily be caught through proofreading, such as these in your current post: knowig for knowing, surprisig for surprising, als for also, versb for verbs, behing for behind.

There are times when such errors can be very misleading, causing questions to be answered incorrectly.

As for the word 'awesome', I think it's common use is not much clearer than 'amazing'. It's also the first word to come out of a 8 year-old boy when asked what he thinks about something. Here's what my dictionary says about 'awe':

-- an emotion variously combining dread, veneration, and wonder that is inspired by authority or by the sacred or sublime
hi.
Sorry about the misspellings. I was in a hurry. That's why.
I talked about the word amazing to a girl from the us yesterday via aim. she said that she doesnt even think that it means that something is surprising. So, according to dictionaries it means that something is surprising. maybe, there is a colloquial use of amazing that just means very good or great? and actually, it just means surprising? i'm just guessing

regards
It's that colloquial use that has corrupted the inherent meaning of the word. Yet for non-native speakers who want to fit in, those corruptions are important to learn.
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