+0
Any professional in the healthcare field except for Psychologists; Paramedics, Pre-med/dental, Medical/Dental students can assist and observe the clinics team.

Is 'except for' referring to only 'psychologists' or to all of the medical professionals in the sentence? thanks.
+0
If the punctuation is correct, only the psychologists are excepted.
+0
K.O.
Any professional in the healthcare field except for Psychologists; Paramedics, Pre-med/dental, Medical/Dental students can assist and observe the clinics team.

This sentence is NOT correctly punctuated in that there is no verb before the semi-colon, which should effectively "end" the sentence. The capitalization is wrong as well. When you have a comma internal to items within a list, sometimes semi-colons are used, but not like this. Try using parentheses as I've re-written below.

Any professional in the healthcare field (e.g., paramedics, pre-medical or pre-dental students, medical or dental students) except psychologists can assist and observe the clinics team.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  
Hi, Mister Micawber,

Yes, the punctuation is correct. Thanks.
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi Grammar Geek,

Any professional in the healthcare field except for Psychologists; Paramedics, Pre-med/dental, Medical/Dental students can assist and observe the clinics team.

I feel, by that style of punctuation, the writer (a native speaker most probably) was trying to give his or her sentence the sense of '....even Paramedics, Pre-med/dental, Medical/Dental students', can assist and observe the clinics team.
I'm sure that's that he was trying to say, but it's not correctly punctuated. If you want to keep the original word order, try this:

Any professional in the healthcare field except for Psychologists -- Paramedics, Pre-med/dental, Medical/Dental students -- can assist and observe the clinics team.

And the capitalization still needs to be fixed. There's no reason to capitalize Medical/Dental in one phrase but leave it lower case in the one preceding.

I'm not disagreeing it was written by a native speaker, but it was written by a native speaker who could find a lot of red pen all over his writing if I were his proofreader.