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"Julia Annas has affirmed that the kind of modern moral skepticism which denies the existence of objective moral values is essentially ‘local’; this means that it rests on a contrast between morality and some other view of the world that is itself immune to skepticism. Richard Bett, on the contrary, has maintained that being non-skeptical about some view of the world is not an indispensable condition for rejecting moral realism."

I have already posted this paragraph, but now I doubt whether I should use a period instead of a semi-colon in the first sentence?

Thanks,

Sextus
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Sextus"Julia Annas has affirmed that the kind of modern moral skepticism which denies the existence of objective moral values is essentially ‘local’; this means that it rests on a contrast between morality and some other view of the world that is itself immune to skepticism. Richard Bett, on the contrary, has maintained that being non-skeptical about some view of the world is not an indispensable condition for rejecting moral realism."

I have already posted this paragraph, but now I doubt whether I should use a period instead of a semi-colon in the first sentence?

Thanks,

Sextus
I firmly believe the period is better for two reasons: 1) the sentence is already "long enough", though this is strictly an aesthetic consideration; 2) this makes for better parallelism when it comes to the on-the-contrary sentence...the two points of view are expressed in their own sentences. [Sound familiar?]
Sounds very familiar! Thanks.

By the way, is it clear that "it" (in "This means that it is based upon...") refers back to "the kind of modern moral skepticism which denies..."?

Sextus
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Would you consider this?--

As to the kind of modern moral skepticism which denies the existence of objective moral values, Julia Annas has affirmed that it is essentially ‘local’, a term which suggests that such skepticism rests on a contrast between morality and some other view of the world that is itself immune to skepticism.

Hi Davkett,

It's a very nice version. The only thing I'm not comfortable with is "suggests". "Means" is more exact, though I don't know if it sounds ok here.

Sextus
Means is better then.

Perhaps, "...a term which here means..."
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DavkettWould you consider this?--

As to the kind of modern moral skepticism which denies the existence of objective moral values, Julia Annas has affirmed that it is essentially ‘local’, a term which suggests that such skepticism rests on a contrast between morality and some other view of the world that is itself immune to skepticism.

I was just wondering if the expression "as to" (and the expression "as for") can be used to begin a paragraph (the paragraph I quoted is the beginning of the abstract of the paper). I thought they were used at the beginning of sentence to introduce a topic or point that is different from, but related to, what has just been said.

Sextus
I would definitely not begin a paragraph on a new topic with either as to or as for. Thus, you would not want to use my revision.
So... I might use "as regards". Or perhaps with this expression I would have the same problem. If this is the case, I could just leave the paragraph as it was... In any case, I could still replace "it" by your suggestion "such skepticism".

Sextus
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