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He is rude, crude and completely incorrigible; yet, always to Brent and Jesse's astonishment, women continuously flock and cling to him.

Is that semi-colon after "incorrigible" fine there?

Thanks.
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SnarfIs that semi-colon after "incorrigible" fine there?
yes
And what about this one here?:

"It’s your money, Matt, that they stick around for; not for you to verbally abuse them and treat them like they’re your concubines."

Is the semi-colon correct there as well?
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SnarfAnd what about this one here?: You can't use a question mark and colon together! Lose the colon.

"It’s your money, Matt, that they stick around for; not for you to verbally abuse them and treat them like they’re your concubines."Is the semi-colon correct there as well? No it isn't, because what follows the semicolon is not an independent clause.
What do you think should be used instead of the semicolon?
canadian45 SnarfAnd what about this one here?: You can't use a question mark and colon together! Lose the colon.
Never ever? Surely there must be exceptions, like in dialogue, for example, if a character said something like, "How's this for three D's?: Deceived, defiled and degraded!
"It’s your money, Matt, that they stick around for; not for you to verbally abuse them and treat them like they’re your concubines."Is the semi-colon correct there as well? No it isn't, because what follows the semicolon is not an independent clause. What do you think should be used instead of the semicolon?
I'm guessing a comma. So wait, you're saying that only a complete sentence can follow a semi-colon? What about this?

"She is suing for physical and traumatic damages; both caused by his reckless actions on the night in question."
Snarfcanadian45 SnarfAnd what about this one here?: You can't use a question mark and colon together! Lose the colon. Never ever? Surely there must be exceptions, maybe, maybe not like in dialogue, for example, if a character said something like,
"How's this for three D's?: Deceived, defiled and degraded! I would put the question mark at the end.

"It’s your money, Matt, that they stick around for; not for you to verbally abuse them and treat them like they’re your concubines."Is the semi-colon correct there as well? No it isn't, because what follows the semicolon is not an independent clause. What do you think should be used instead of the semicolon?

I'm guessing a comma. Yes, that's the standard way of separating dependent and independent clauses.
So wait, you're saying that only a complete sentence can follow a semi-colon? No, I certainly didn't say that!

What about this?" She is suing for physical and traumatic damages; both caused by his reckless actions on the night in question." no, same reason as before
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Here you go, Snarf. You might want to try Google once in a while.

http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Semicolons.html
Thanks, Gus. Will do. Let me ask you guys, though - is the following an independent clause? I ask because I want to use it after a semi-colon (the ellipses represents the sentence leading up to it with the semi-colon):

...not very pleasant at all.

And this right here I'm almost a hundred percent sure needs a semi-colon, because both a comma and a period after "this" make the rest look ridiculous, I think. Am I right?

He gives a very excited smile to Jesse, letting him know how much he loves this; that he, in fact, lives for it.
Snarf… is the following an independent clause? ... not very pleasant at all. I ask because I want to use it after a semi-colon …
No, it's not even a clause. You should look into that subject as well.
SnarfAnd this right here I'm almost a hundred percent sure needs a semi-colon, because both a comma and a period after "this" make the rest look ridiculous, I think. Am I right?
No. That he, in fact, lives for it is dependent, hence the subordinator, that. You wouldn't use a semicolon or a period.

letting him know how much he loves this, that he, in fact, lives for it.

If you're worried about too many commas, you could drop the ones before and after in fact; in fact, I would. Emotion: smile
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