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Hello. I'm new to your list. I am trying to develop a lesson plan for the use of semi colons and colons and I came across an example at a reputable website, but I think it is wrong. I'd like your opinion please.

Here is the punctuation on the example:

Time is short; however; we will still get the job done.

Grammar is not my strong suit, but the above sentence doesn't look right to me. Should the sentence be edited?

Thanks for your help.
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Comments  
The sentence you have quoted is incorrect.

Semi colons are used when there is a change of thought or absence of a connective in mid sentence. The sentence should read:

Time is short, however we will still get the job done.

An example of semi colon usage would be: Time is short; we will still get the job done.

The use of a connective such as 'however' requires a comma in this instance.

Hope this helps
I do not know if this posting is super old; however, you need to model your sentence after this one!

; however,

not ; however;

Emotion: smile
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correct pununciation is

Time is short; however, we will still get the job done.
[:^)]

Yes, the original sentence was incorrect, but I do not agree with Timbo's answer as for the correct semicolon usage and the punctuation for the two sentences, i.e. two completely different thoughts, both with an independent subjext and verb.

The correct way of making these two statements and joining them so that the realtionship is visibly evident is as follows:

"Time is short; however, we will still get the job done."

In our modern day, the written English in many of the visual forms that we see from day to day, reflects more of our conversational use of the language, and its punctuation also appears to follow the way that we speak and breathe along the way! Written English is also higly affected by our use of "text messaging" and "blogs"; we have forgotten the sound, correct rules of punction as a result.

Teaching English as a Second Language must be a real nightmare.

Good luck.

Cathy
I'm sure that Cathy's post would read much clearer as exemplified in the following:

In our modern day, the written English in many of the visual forms that we see from day to day, reflects more of our conversational use of the language and its punctuation; also appears to follow the way that we speak and breathe along the way! Written English is also highly affected by our use of "text messaging" and "blogs"; we have forgotten the sound, correct rules of punctuation as a result.

Note that my change, reflecting my opinion, includes a semicolon separation between the two ideas in the first sentence: "conversational use of the language and its punctuation" and "the way that we speak and breathe." I find little fault with the second sentence; excepting that, I would have preferred the use of "and" in place of the comma following "sound." For example: Written English is also highly affected by our use of "text messaging" and "blogs"; we have forgotten the sound and correct rules of punctuation as a result.

Regards,

Nothing else to do; this late of night. LOL?
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TimboThe sentence you have quoted is incorrect.

Semi colons are used when there is a change of thought or absence of a connective in mid sentence. The sentence should read:

Time is short, however we will still get the job done.

An example of semi colon usage would be: Time is short; we will still get the job done.

The use of a connective such as 'however' requires a comma in this instance.

Hope this helps
I beg to differ

Time is short, however we will still get the job done. -- incorrect

---------------

An adverbial conjunction, also known as a conjunctive adverb, is a word which functions both as an adverb and a conjunction.

Words such as however and besides are adverbials that connect independent clauses (or sentences). As an adverb, an adverbial conjunction modifies the second clause, and as a conjunction, it joins the two clauses, showing a relationship between them. Conjunctive adverbs can be placed in different positions within a clause without changing the meaning.
Examples:

We wanted to go on a picnic; however, the weather turned
bad and we weren't able to go.
We wanted to go on a picnic; the weather turned bad, however,
and we weren't able to go.
We wanted to go on a picnic. The weather turned bad and we
weren't able to go, however. -- comma when at the end of the sentence


Note in the above examples that independent clauses connected by a conjunctive adverb must be separated by a semicolon or a period, not a comma.

Some common conjunctive adverbs are:
     accordingly    however        nonetheless
also incidentally now
anyway indeed otherwise
besides instead similarly
certainly likewise still
consequently meanwhile then
finally moreover thereafter
further namely therefore
furthermore nevertheless thus
hence next undoubtedly
Time is short. However, we will still get the job done.
Time is short; however, we will still get the job done.

I think that the above is the best sentence.
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