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Hello. Long time reader first time poster. (I suppose using a sentence fragment is probably not the best way to introduce myself.)

Anyway, I'm having trouble with the following sentence:

"In fact, force and hatred are the normal responses to the humiliation and degradation of occupation; love the anomalous one."

A. I'm wondering if I can use this semicolon. I'd prefer not to change the sentence to "...occupation, while love is the anomalous one" because I feel it would lose the sort of dramatic effect I'm going for.

B. I'd love any verb suggestions to replace "are" in the first clause.

Thank you for your help.
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Comments  
I think a comma would interrupt the flow less:

"In fact, force and hatred are the normal responses to the humiliation and degradation of occupation, love the anomalous one."

or with an "em dash," for a more visual contrast:

"In fact, force and hatred are the normal responses to the humiliation and degradation of occupation--love the anomalous one."
Thank you for your response.

I think interrupting the flow is an important part of the "dramatic effect" I'm trying to establish. I'm wondering what would be grammatically correct.

Would a semicolon be correct even though "love the anomalous one" is a fragment/dependent clause? Perhaps my understanding of the semicolon is incorrect, but I was under the impression that it connects two independent clauses.

Perhaps the question boils down to this: is it possible to connect an independent clause with a dependent clause without using a conjunction?
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Hello Daedalus, welcome to EF!

Here's one possibility:

"In fact, force and hatred are the normal responses to the humiliation and degradation of occupation; love, the anomalous one."

By inserting a comma, you preclude the misreading of "love" as an imperative.

On the other hand, there is a slight disharmony in the last clause, as "is" isn't implicit in the first clause. You could exchange "force and hatred" for "violence", however, and change "are" to "is", which would solve that problem (if it seems like a problem to you, that is).

MrP
PS:

In response to your second post, yes, the semi-colon is fine in your example.

MrP
Hi, and welcome to the wonderful world of posting.

How is "force" a response? Hatred is, certainly, but I'm not sure this is saying what you mean.

The problem with the semicolon is that it requires a complete sentence. "Love the anomalous one" reads like a command - I have to go figure out who or what the anomalous one is and go love it/him/her. I like Marius's idea of the em dash (I know some gurus here don't like them, but I do), but I think you need to replace the part after the dash with "love is the anomalous response."

If you don't want to repeat the word "response," then rearrange the first part of the sentence so that "one" comes closer (in word order) to the word "response" - The humiliation and degradation of occupation (effect, cause, lead to... pick your verb) force [?] and hatred as the normal responses -- love being the anomalous one.

There are other options, but I have to go make dinner now Emotion: smile
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Ah, brilliant! Thank you so much for your help. That was exactly what I was looking for. Much obliged!
Thank you all so much for your help.

Perhaps it would be clearer if I provided the context:

To preach love to a bar full of Irish nationalists in 1904 is to deny the legitimacy of force and hatred as a response to oppression. In fact, force and hatred are the normal responses to the humiliation and degradation of occupation; love, the anomalous one.

Both "force" and "hatred" are used because they are included in the text: (i.e., "stand up to it with force like men" and "But it’s no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that.")
Ah!

Now I understand the "Daedalus".
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