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Hi, I would very much appreciate your help with these:

Caramelization causes important changes in foods, not only in colour but also in flavour.

1) 'in foods'= adj phrase modifying in foods

2) not only in colour but also in flavour.= a second adjective phrase joined by correlative conjunctions, modifying changes?

3) Also, the bold words are correct, yes?

Alistair, a friend of my father's/father, recently passed away in a tragic car accident.

Alistair, a friend of mine, recently...

Thank you kindly.
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1-- 'in foods'= adj phrase modifying changes
2-- That sounds reasonable.
3-- In the first sentence, both forms of the possessive are correct; the double possessive is probably more common, at least in spoken English.
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Mister Micawber'in foods'= adj phrase modifying changes

Sorry, that was what I meant to write.
Mister Micawber3-- In the first sentence, both forms of the possessive are correct; the double possessive is probably more common, at least in spoken English.
I'm afraid I don't understand this one. Why is the possessive used here.The word doesn't possess anything. If it were something that he possessed, then that would be clear to me, to use the appostrophe.

Alistair, a friend of my father's/father,

Doesn't using the possessive form create the following meaning?

Alistair, a friend of my father's friend,
The English double possessive is a very common way of showing possession. A friend of my father's = one of my father's friends. That is all you need to know about this.

However, consider: This is a picture of my mother vs This is a picture of my mother's.