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Kindly check if this sentence is correct.

I request all of you having joined the meeting to take notes.


I have a friend having gone to London.

Here, I mean to say I have a friend who has gone to London.

Kindly elaborate on the sentence structure and demonstrate more examples.

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jayprakash SinghI request all of you having joined the meeting to take notes.
I have a friend having gone to London.

These sentences are not correct.

jayprakash SinghI have a friend who has gone to London.

This is correct.

As far as your first sentence is concerned, the following would be correct:

I request all of you, having joined the meeting, to take notes.

However, this has a formal or written feel, and there would be more common ways to say it in everyday English, such as "I ask all of you who have joined the meeting to take notes".

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jayprakash Singh... having joined the meeting ...
... having gone to London ...

It seems you are trying to work out how this "perfect participle" verb form can be used.

The first thing you should know is that we don't often put it in the middle of a sentence as you have done. In fact, the best way to use that construction is to place it at the beginning of a sentence, where it often has the same meaning as a because-clause whose implicit subject is the same as the subject of the main clause that follows.

Having lost the game, the team was very disappointed.
(The team was very disappointed because they had lost the game.)

Having read the book, she enjoyed the film even more.
(She enjoyed the film even more because she had read the book.)

Having traveled extensively in Germany, I was familiar with the culture.
(I was familiar with the culture because I had traveled extensively in Germany.)

Having seen the danger in that neighborhood, the tourists moved away to another part of the city.
(The tourists moved away to another part of the city because they had seen the danger in that neighborhood.)

Having misjudged the time, the orator had to rush through the rest of his speech.
(The orator had to rush through the rest of his speech because he had misjudged the time.)


Based on your sentences, you could write new sentences like these:

Having joined the meeting, the attendees were eager to listen to others' ideas and to take notes.

Having gone to London, the manager was not available to attend the meeting in Dublin.


There are other ways to use the perfect participle, but it's not possible to explain everything in one post.

CJ