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Hi folks,

Wondering if anyone can help me on the grammar of this sentence.

Contributing to an advancement in medical science was such a gratifying feeling that I plan to continue to participate in summer research opportunities available in medical school.

Should it say I plan to participate (cut out the continue) to be proper? In addition, I feel like a comma is needed but where? Any suggestions on making it sound better are welcome! Thanks
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Contributing to an advancement in medical science was such a gratifying feeling, that I plan to participate in summer research at medical school.

Continue to participate in summer research is also ok, but only if the previous research was also summer research. Or you could put, continue to participate in research this summer' or 'particpate in further research this summer' or 'participate in research again this summer' if the time of year is important to you.

The word opportunities is unecessary, it's not wrong, but your sentence is a bit long winded as is.

I plan to 'take part in' is better than participate in, as a matter of style as simpler words are usually better to use than more complex ones.
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... or at least it leaves me winded.

Where've you been, Nona?

Oh, and of course, welcome to English Forums, Stallion.
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Thank you! I'm slowly working on my English grammar skills so I might have other questions about sentence structure in the coming days.
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Hi MR M

I've been popping in and out when I can but busy chasing after paying work at the moment...[bah]