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As early as the seventeenth century, philosophers called attention to the ---- character of the issue, and their twentieth-century counterparts still approach it with ----.
(A) absorbing.. indifference
(B) unusual.. composure
(C) complex.. antipathy
(D) auspicious.. caution
(E) problematic.. uneasiness

This kind of question is the most troublesome I would say, because you are not sure if it is right when you pick up an answer.

In the first place I thought it should be "D. caution" for the second blank telling from "called attention to"; however, "the auspicious character" makes no sense. Then I refocused on "E. problematic" for the first blank; however, I can't give myself a good reason for "uneasiness" for the second blank, because there seem to be no information in the sentence suggesting the "uneasiness".

Sincerely hope you will help me out. Many thanks!
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Hi Jeff,

As early as the seventeenth century, philosophers called attention to the ---- character of the issue, and their twentieth-century counterparts still approach it with ----.
(A) absorbing.. indifference
(B) unusual.. composure
(C) complex.. antipathy
(D) auspicious.. caution
(E) problematic.. uneasiness


Then I refocused on "E. problematic" for the first blank; however, I can't give myself a good reason for "uneasiness" for the second blank, because there seem to be no information in the sentence suggesting the "uneasiness". I'd say it's definitely E. You're right that there is no reason given for the uneasiness, but then again, there is no reason given for 'problematic'. The sentence is not intended to discuss the nature of the philosophical problem. The implication is that philosophers will be uneasy because of the difficulty of the problem.

C is also possible. However, I see philosophers as enjoying complex issues.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you Clive. But every question like this has its key words to suggest the answer. For example:

Because the high seriousness of their narratives resulted in part from their metaphysics, Southern writers were praised for their ---- bent.
(A) technical
(B) discursive
(C) hedonistic
(D) philosophical
(E) scientific
"Metaphysics" suggests the answer "philosophical". (Without metaphysics, I don't think there's the enough reason to rule out A, E.)

The form and physiology of leaves vary according to the ---- in which they develop: for example, leaves display a wide range of adaptations to different degrees of light and moisture.
(A) relationship
(B) species
(C) sequence
(D) patterns
(E) environment
"Light and moisture" suggests the answer "enviroment"

Though ---- in her personal life, Edna St. Vincent Millay was nonetheless ---- about her work, usually producing several pages of complicated rhyme in a day.
(A) jaded.. feckless
(B) verbose.. ascetic
(C) vain.. humble
(D) impulsive.. disciplined
(E) self-assured.. sanguine
Here "rhyme" suggests the answer "disciplined", and "though" indicates that the two words for the blanks should be opposite.

There are tons of examples. So if I couldn't find the key words that would imply the answer, I'll be so hesitant to choose the choice, even though the one sounds most right for the question.
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Hi,

Well, I understand what you're saying.

I think doing these 'problems' is not '100% science', there's a bit of an art to it as well. That's why they can be interesting.

Clive
CliveI think doing these 'problems' is not '100% science', there's a bit of an art to it as well. That's why they can be interesting.

Indeed. Emotion: smile Now help me look at this one:
Because modern scientists find the ancient Greek view of the cosmos outdated and irrelevant, they now perceive it as only of ----- interest.
(A) historical
(B) intrinsic
(C) astronomical
(D) experimental
(E) superfluous

I think if there's no other information that suggests "historical", choices B C D E would be right too. So what is it? Thank you once again.
Hi,

A. The mention of 'modern' seems to invite us to contrast to 'historical', don't you think?

Clive
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Yes, Clive. Thank you.

As early as the seventeenth century, philosophers called attention to the ---- character of the issue, and their twentieth-century counterparts still approach it with ----.


There's an easy way to solve this.

We got 2 timelines running simultaneously. one during the 17th century assume the character of something is 'x' and in 20th century they STILL approach it as 'x', which goes to say that the words are synonyms, or atleast they are exhibiting the same train of thought.

(E) seems best in that aspect as the 17th century guys find it problematic, and the 20th century guys, who STILL find the character problematic face uneasiness facing the problematic situation.

anonymousThere's an easy way ...

Maybe you don't realize it, but you are answering a question that was asked 14 years ago. Emotion: surprise

Why not answer questions that are more recent? That way there's a better chance that the person who asked the question is still participating on our forum and can benefit from your answer.

CJ

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