Hi,

I ran across this sentence

People considered Chris honest.

Is this sentence legal? what part of speech is honest in this sentence? (I thought honest can only be adj.)

Chris is considered honest. The grammar book transformed the sentence into passive but I am tempted to add "to be"

I hear people use the sentences from above, but grammatically I don't understand why they are used.

Are the following sentences correct?

People considered Chris to be honest or People considered chris to be a honest person/guy.

Chris is considered to be honest (by many people)
holydukePeople considered Chris honest.
Is this sentence legal? what part of speech is honest in this sentence?
The sentence is fine. honest is an adjective, as you correctly guessed. The adjective honest functions as an object complement.

holydukeI am tempted to add "to be"
You could add that if you wanted. Verbs that take this pattern might take "to be", "as" or nothing at all to connect the object complement to the rest of the sentence. You just have to know which patterns are grammatical with which verbs. consider usually takes no connector or "to be".

holydukeAre the following sentences correct?
People considered Chris to be honest or People considered Chris to be a honest person/guy.
Chris is considered to be honest (by many people)
All OK.

I recommend that you read the material on this topic at the following link so that you can learn all six patterns that are used for this kind of grammatical construction:

difference between "consider" and "consider to"

CJ
object complements...

I really wished I had studied harder by myself when I was young Emotion: sad

[frankly, in all my year under "American" education", no English teacher ever taught me anything close to this XD]

Thanks a load!!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
holydukefrankly, in all my year under "American" education", no English teacher ever taught me anything close to this
That is understandable. These are very advanced topics. You should be happy with your progress, because now you are asking questions about very specialized grammar that even most native speakers don't know very much about. Emotion: smile

CJ