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Hi dear teachers, 

I'd like you to help me with the following sentences by checking them if they need any correction, please. 

1) Only if a girl talks to a guy day and night doesn't mean that she loves him as well.

2) If only a girl talks to a guy day and night doesn't mean that she loves him as well.  

Could we use either, 'only if' or 'if only', as I have used in the examples above, please?

3) It wasn't your fault, it was mine, indeed. I misunderstood you, your smile, your things.  

(Is it correct to say 'it was mine' as in sentence #3 above, please? Or should I say 'it was my (fault)'?

 Thank you.
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LaboriousYes, I meant what you said above. Could we also say 'when' in place of 'just because'? For example; When a girl talks to a guy day and night, it doesn't mean that she loves him as well.
"Just because..." sets the sentence off in the right direction and makes it clear to the reader that a contrast is coming. "When ..." doesn't achieve this so well.
Comments  
(1) and (2) aren't correct, and it isn't very clear to me what you are trying to say. It's possible that you mean "Just because a girl talks to a guy day and night, it doesn't mean that she loves him as well."

"it was mine" in (3) is fine. "your things" feels vague and doesn't fit the context terribly well.
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Thank you, for your reply, GPY.
GPYIt's possible that you mean "Just because a girl talks to a guy day and night, it doesn't mean that she loves him as well.
Yes, I meant what you said above. Could we also say 'when' in place of 'just because'? For example; When a girl talks to a guy day and night, it doesn't mean that she loves him as well.

Thank you.
 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks to you, GPY. Can't thank you enough! Emotion: smile
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LaboriousIt wasn't your fault, it was mine, indeed. I misunderstood you, your smile, your things. (Is it correct to say 'it was mine' ...
Yes. The series you need to replace a combination of a possessive determiner and a noun is mine, his, hers, ours, yours, theirs.

Is it my turn to play? No, it's hers. (hers = her turn)
Whose shirt is this? It's mine. (mine = my shirt)
Jerry likes the Johnsons' house a lot, but he likes ours better. (ours = our house)

CJ