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Hi teachers,

Would you correct the sentences regarding time sequence below? Thank you.

1. Up until now, I thought you wanted to go to the medical school. I had no idea you want to be an artist.

2. Up until now, I thought you had wanted to go to the medical school. I had no idea you want to be an artist.

Do "I thought you wanted / had wanted" both convey the same time seqence?

Thank you.

TN
Comments  
1. Up until now, I thought you wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

2. Up until now, I thought you had wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

3. Up until now, I had thought you wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

Do "I thought you wanted / had wanted" both convey the same time seqence?-- Yes.
Dear Mister Micawber,

1. Up until now, I thought you wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

2. Up until now, I thought you had wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

3. Up until now, I had thought you wanted to go to medical school. I had no idea you wanted/want to be an artist.

Thank you for giving the sentences corrections. I noticed you have added #3.

Do all 3 sentences with "I thought and I had thought" convey the same time sequence so they can be interchangeable? Thanks

Regards,

Tinanam
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They do to me, Tinanam. The past perfect is a dying verb form and is useful only in limited cases where the precedence of past events would really be unclear without it. In other uses as here-- where the logical sequence of events is evident-- it is just an exercise for EFL students.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Thank you for the explanation.

While we're on this subject, could I ask you to correct the following time sequence based off conversation between John and Jane? Conversations as follows:

Jane does not show up for work. Showing concerned, John calls Jane on the phone because he thought Jane was coming to work.

John: Jane, I thought you were coming to work today.

Jane: I'm sorry John, but my little one was having trouble with swallowing and I needed to stay home taking care of him. I'll make up work next week.

Last Wednesday Jane didn't show up for work. John had thought she'd be working / were working that Wednesday. Showing concerned, John called Jane on the phone. Jane told John that she was sorry because her little one were having trouble with swallowing and she had needed to stay home taking care of him. She said she would make up work the week later. (Hi Mister Micawber, I'm not sure if "had thought" is correct here, and which one should be followed by, "she'd be working" or "were working"?) Thanks.

Regards,

Tinanam
Last Wednesday Jane didn't show up for work. John thought she'd be / she was working that Wednesday. Concerned, John called Jane, and she told him that she was sorry because her little one was having trouble swallowing and she needed to stay home to take care of him. She said she would make up the work later in the week.
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Hi Mister Micawber,

Thank you very much.

Regards,

Tinanam