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Hi

From the picture it will become clear what she is famous for.

Is it considered 'bad style' if this sentence ends with a preposition?

Thank you in advance!

Dokterjokkebrok
Comments  
Absolutely not. I think 99% of native speakers would never say, "From the picture it will become clear for what she is famous." Too unnatural.
In the past there were some debates about this, but it is now completely accepted (as anon said).

"This is the sort of English up with which I will not put." --- Sir Winston Churchill Emotion: smile
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OK. Thanks.
According to American Heritage, it was John Dryden who first started, in the 17th Century,the idea of not ending a sentence with a preposition. It became popular by the 18th Century and then became schoolbook law. Objection to the rule has a good base, in that many other Germanic languages are well known for the practice of final preposition. Exactly why Dryden objected to it, I'm not sure. But as others will comment, adherence is very much a thing of the past.
Philip Exactly why Dryden objected to it, I'm not sure.

My best guess is because it's called a pre-position, not a post-position.
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ferdis
Philip Exactly why Dryden objected to it, I'm not sure.

My best guess is because it's called a pre-position, not a post-position.

Emotion: big smile

ferdis
Philip Exactly why Dryden objected to it, I'm not sure.
My best guess is because it's called a pre-position, not a post-position.

Haha, can't argue with that. Smart thinking Ferdis. Emotion: wink

Thanks all!
PhilipExactly why Dryden objected to it, I'm not sure.
I always thought it had to do with trying to force-fit English grammar into Latin grammar. Anyway, for those who are interested here is a site on the subject that seems fairly well researched and documented.
http://grammar.about.com/b/2008/03/26/prepositions-ending-sentences-with.htm
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