Please help! i have no idea what the answer is but i am trying to find the answer for an english thing. Apparently there is a common sentence which uses the same word eleven times, although the punctuation does not have to be the same. Aargh - so annoying!
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Hello! I need the answer too... But i have heard that the word used eleven times in a row is the word "had"...

Thx...
here we go..

www.geocities.com/CollegePark/6174/had-had.htm

Have fun !

Brk
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James, while John had had "had," had had "had had";

"had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.

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James, while John had had "had," had had "had had";

"had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.

Thanks to Wikepedia!
I've heard:

"I think that that "that" that that person used in the sentance was used incorrectly"
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can you explain what do you mean by "had" & "had had"?

Thanks,
I can try!

Had is like I had this thing. I had a shoe. Something that I possessed in the past.

Had had means the same thing really but in certain situations it makes more sense to use the double. "Had had" is used when speaking about the past then within that past tense speaks about ownership.

"I had a bage this morning" ("this" - talking about the present)

"I had had a bagel that morning" ("that" - talking about some past morning)

So the sentence:

James, while John had had "had," had had "had had";

"had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.

It's talking about James and John writing something, most likely for an English class. James had had "had had" - James wrote "had had" on his paper. When it says "James had had" it's just referring to James in the past - what he had (the English paper) then the second had refers to what he did - or possessed in the past. John wrote a single had on his english paper. The teacher preferred James' double had.

Does this make any sense? It's difficult to explain! Even for a native English speaker I really had to think about it - it's just natural to use the double had in certain situations! You can always use a single had - but it's not always right to use the double - so if you're not sure use only one "had" and even if you could've used two - no one will notice! It's not something that people think about when speaking or would ever be critical about.
Answer: James, while John had had "had", had had "had had"; "had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.
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