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Doctor: How did you sustain this injury?
Victory:(1)Because I was forced to exercise for a long time, I sustained this injury.
(2)Being forced to exercise for a long time, I sustained this injury.
It is unsuitable to answer the doctor question with the second pattern.
Could anybody tell me when the second type of sentence pattern is used?

(1)Because Lucus is generous and loves his alma mater very much, he donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.
(2)Being generous and loving his alma mater very much, Lucus donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.
Please help me!
Many thanks in advance
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Hi,

Doctor: How did you sustain this injury?

Victory:(1)Because I was forced to exercise for a long time, I sustained this injury.

(2)Being forced to exercise for a long time, I sustained this injury.

Please note this first.

Your dialogue is much too formal to be realistic. Here's a more typical version.

Doctor: How did you do this?

Victory: Exercising for a long time.

It also sounds odd to say you were 'forced' to exercise. It sounds like someone pointed a gun at you and said 'Exercise!'

It is unsuitable to answer the doctor question with the second pattern.

It's not a question.

I wouldn't say it's unsuitable. I'd say it's not a common way to speak.

Could anybody tell me when the second type of sentence pattern is used?

(1)Because Lucus is generous and loves his alma mater very much, he donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.

(2)Being generous and loving his alma mater very much, Lucus donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.

#2 is more formal, and more typical of writen English. In order to produce a sentence like this, most native speakers need first to think carefully and plan in detail. That's why it is not typical of spontaneous everyday speech.

Best wishes, Clive
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(1)Because Lucus is generous and loves his alma mater very much, he donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.
(2)Being generous and loving his alma mater very much, Lucus donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.
What I hope most to know is?

When the second type of sentence is more suitable to be used?
The second type of sentence give me the feeling that it's lack of the meaning of cause and effect.So I think the second one it is not very suitable to be used when others ask you why.
So that makes me confused that when the sentence type of pattern is more suitable.
the second type of sentence pattern gives me the feeling that it is more suitable to be used when we are going to talk about sequence.

Actually,I don't know whether my opinion is right or not?
Hi,

(1)Because Lucus is generous and loves his alma mater very much, he donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.

(2)Being generous and loving his alma mater very much, Lucus donates a big sum of money when his school is in need.

What I hope most to know is?

When the second type of sentence is more suitable to be used?

The second type of sentence give me the feeling that it's lack of the meaning of cause and effect.So I think the second one it is not very suitable to be used when others ask you why. That's true. The 'cause' is more implicit. The grammar just really says 'consider these two things together'.

So that makes me confused that when the sentence type of pattern is more suitable.

the second type of sentence pattern gives me the feeling that it is more suitable to be used when we are going to talk about sequence. No, I see less sense of 'sequence' here, and even less sense of explicit connection between the two parts.

Consider these examples.

Because he was generous, he donated money. (explicit cause and effect)

Being generous, he donated money. (implicit cause and effect)

Being generous, he cooked dinner. (no cause and effect intended. This just means that he was generous and he cooked dinner.)

Finally, and speaking very, very generally, I'd say it is more common to give the effect first, followed by the reason.

eg He broke his leg because he fell down rather than Because he fell down, he broke his leg.

Personally, I think we tend to think first of the effect and then of the cause.

Best wishes, Clive