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Hi, can some please explain the structure of the following sentences.


1. Apple to start planning for ipo


What are the subject, object, Gerunds/infinitive and verb in this sentence.



Is 'To start' an infinitive or verb


2. It would have an integrated module.


Is this an example of ' Simple Conditional' or

'Perfect Conditional'

As ' integrated' is an adjective not a verb so it's should be a simple tense according to me.

Thanks

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anonymous1. Apple to start planning for ipo. What are the subject, object, Gerunds/infinitive and verb in this sentence.Is 'To start' an infinitive or verb

This looks like a slightly compressed headline from some publication, where it is to be understood as "Apple are to start planning for IPO"

The subject is "Apple" and the predicate is the verb phrase "(are) to start planning for IPO.

"To start planning for IPO" is an infinitival clause as complement of the ellipted "are".

"Planning for IPO" is a gerund-participial clause functioning as complement of "start".

anonymous2. It would have an integrated module.Is this an example of ' Simple Conditional' or 'Perfect Conditional. As 'integrated' is an adjective not a verb, so it should be a simple tense according to me.

Yes -- probably the apodosis in a conditional construction. This is not the perfect auxiliary verb "have", but the lexical verb "have", meaning "possess". The noun phrase "an integrated module" is direct object of "have".

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Hi Billj

Thanks for answering this.

Just one thing can it also be understood as


Apple subject, are to (verbal idiom), start (verb), planning (Gerund/noun)

anonymous

Just one thing can it also be understood as


Apple subject, are to (verbal idiom), start (verb), planning (Gerund/noun)

Not quite: "planning" is a verb, not a noun. "Start" is called a catenative verb and the clause "planning for IPO" is its catenative complement.

The term 'catenative' is derived from the Latin word for "chain", which is appropriate here since "start" and "planning" do indeed form a chain of two verbs.

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Ok thanks Billj