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Hi everyone,

Please forgive the vague subject title. I really have no idea what area of grammar this is under.

I have often seen sentences like this: He met and married her in 1982, him being a bachelor at that point in time.

Are sentences like this grammatical? It sounds very awkward to me.

I can understand sentences like this though: Being a bachelor at that point in time, he married her in 1982.

Is this correct then?

Can someone please advise? Thank you!
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SJ88He met and married her in 1982, him being a bachelor at that point in time.
I consider this sentence ungrammatical but of course there may be other opinions. There is nothing to justify the object form him, which acts as the subject of being as if being were a gerund.
SJ88 Being a bachelor at that point in time, he married her in 1982.
This sentence is grammatical. I would probably reword it: Being a bachelor in 1982, he married her [then]. Being is a present partciple and indicates the reason why he married her: Because he was a bachelor in 1982, he married her. That is a rather odd reason, though. Most men marry a woman because they love her, not because they are bachelors.Emotion: wink

Another example of a causal being: Being tired, I went to bed early.

CB
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Thanks for your reply, CB! =)

I'd just like to clarify something though. Using your example, would it be all right to say, "I went to be early, being tired" ?

It sounds a bit more awkward than the original, yet does not sound completely wrong. Any idea whether it's all right?

Thanks!
SJ88 "I went to be early, being tired"
My ear egrees with yours. Even though it is unusual to place the causal clause equivalent (being tired) after the main clause, I know no grammarian who considers it wrong. I think it might be used in casual conversation if the speaker decided to add the reason for his going to bed as an afterthought.

CB
I see..thanks so much for your help, CB! =)
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