+0
The present friendship of America may be of but little moment to her; but the future destinies of that country do not admit of a doubt; over those of England there lower some shadows of uncertainty.

Q1) Does 'but' has significant meaning?(I don't know why it is added.) Can't 'but be left out?

Q2) I don't understand the structure and the meaning of the second underlined part. ('there' makes the interpretation difficult)
Comments  
Hi,

The present friendship of America may be of but little moment to her; but the future destinies of that country do not admit of a doubt; over those of England there lower some shadows of uncertainty.

Q1) Does 'but' has significant meaning?(I don't know why it is added.) Can't 'but be left out?

It means '. . . of no more than / only little moment . . . '

eg I have but one dollar - I have no more than / only one dollar.

Q2) I don't understand the structure and the meaning of the second underlined part. ('there' makes the interpretation difficult)

It's an uncommon and rhetorical word order that means

over the future destinies of England some shadows of uncertainty lower

or

some shadows of uncertainty lower over the future destinies of England.

A simpler example is

eg in this house there live 5 people.

eg in this house 5 people live.

eg 5 people live in this house.

Clive
Thank you, Clive.

Ah.. 'but' has that meaning out out many.

'There' is used to make a 'rhetorical word order.'

Q1) I think this 'there' is restricted to some verbs, isn't it? e.g. there apprears/seems/occurs/ etc.?

Q2) Rhetorical structure is usually used in a story, isn't it?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi,

There' is used to make a 'rhetorical word order.'

Q1) I think this 'there' is restricted to some verbs, isn't it? e.g. there apprears/seems/occurs/ etc.?

Not necessarily. eg On to the stage there walked two people.

Q2) Rhetorical structure is usually used in a story, isn't it?

Not necessarily. It's used in any formal situaton where you want to persuade people or impress people. A prime example is in a political speech. Obama, for instance, is one of today's great rhetoricians.

Clive
Thank you again^^

Ah......... now I get to know more about the embedded 'there'

As you already explained, 'there' can be added in the middle of a sentence to make it rhetorical.

So, that is different from my example 'there' in 'There appears/seems/lived,' isn't it?

And it can be restricted when it is placed in the front of a sentence like above , can't it?
Hi,

Maybe you'd like to write few sentences for us to check?

Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
There seems to be a disagreement.

Unfortunately , there appears to be no immediate prospect of that .

There remains the problem of finance.

In the deep woods,there live the squirrels and the giraffes

Here there live a tribe of people known as the Dobe Ju/?hoansi

They are example sentences having 'there' at the front of the sentences(when adverbs and prepositional phrases are not considered)
Hi,

There seems to be a disagreement.

Unfortunately , there appears to be no immediate prospect of that .

There remains the problem of finance.

In the deep woods,there live the squirrels and the giraffes

If the squirrels and giraffes have not already been mentioned, just say

In the deep woods,there live squirrels and giraffes.

Here there lives a tribe of people known as the Dobe .

(It's one tribe, so singular is better)

Clive