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Hello, I have questions in the following sentences. If you answer my questions, I thank you for answering.

Q1.

Perhaps Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and the earlier six volumes were genuinely brilliant─despite the fact that eight publishers declined to publish the first volume. But although success is at least partly determined by intrinsic quality, it is also possible that what people come to like depends very much on what they believe others like. In such a world, the explanation for why a particular book becomes a hit may be as simple as this publisher’s: “It sold well because lots of people bought it.”


Q1. In the above passage, can I paraphrase ‘what they believe others like’ into ‘popular popularity’ or popularity among people?

Are both[‘popular popularity’ or popularity among people] correct?

Is Popular popularity somewhat clumsy?

Q2

Salespeople who are optimistic sell more than those who are pessimistic by 56 percent.

Salespeople who are optimistic sell 56 percent more than those who are pessimistic.

In the above sentences, is the sentence below grammatically correct?

Please reply.

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Juniper KimQ1. In the above passage, can I paraphrase ‘what they believe others like’ into ‘popular popularity’ or popularity among people?

Not really, no. You would lose some of the original meaning.

Juniper KimIs Popular popularity somewhat clumsy?

Yes.

Juniper KimSalespeople who are optimistic sell more than those who are pessimistic by 56 percent.
Salespeople who are optimistic sell 56 percent more than those who are pessimistic.
In the above sentences, is the sentence below grammatically correct?

Yes.

Comments  
Juniper KimQ1. In the above passage, can I paraphrase ‘what they believe others like’ into ‘popular popularity’ or popularity among people?

No. A simple "popularity" is OK.

Juniper KimAre both[‘popular popularity’ or popularity among people] correct?

No. The word "popularity" already includes the idea of many people. The similarity between the words "popular" and "people" is no accident.

Juniper KimIn the above sentences, is the sentence below grammatically correct?

I think you mean the second sentence by "the sentence below". Yes, and it means the same thing as the first one.

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 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you for your answers, but I have an additional question about your previous answer.

In the above first question, is widespread(or prevalent) popularity clumy, too?

Please answer.

Juniper KimIn the above first question, is widespread(or prevalent) popularity clumy, too?

"widespread popularity" is OK in itself, but it is not a very good substitute for "what they believe others like" in the original sentence. "prevalent popularity" doesn't sound right.

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How about 'the vogue or craze or rage?

I'm sorry to bother you, but I really want to know that. So if you answer my question, I thank you very much.

Juniper Kim

How about 'the vogue or craze or rage?

I'm sorry to bother you, but I really want to know that. So if you answer my question, I thank you very much.

No, these words do not work properly as a substitute for the original phrase. I don't believe that there is a single word that means "what they believe others like".

I really thank you for your answer.

Have a good day!

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