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I am having problems with a couple of sentences. I just cant seem to come up with the right ones.

He is the _____of the two brothers and the ______.

a. youngest;friendliest
b. youngest;friendlier
c. younger;friendliest
d. younger;friendlier
I chose C.

As both products are good, order the _____one from the ______competent of the two clerks.

a. cheaper;more
b. cheapest;most
c. cheaper;most
d. cheapest;more

i chose C.
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Hi tknjhall,

I am guessing that the point of the exercise is to choose "-er" for only two objects in a comparison, and "-est" for three or more objects in a comparison.

So 1 - C, and 2 - A.

As both (2) products are good, order the cheapER one from the more competent of the TWO clerks.

More is analogous to our "-er" words. Most is analogous to our "-est" words.

Hope that helps.

MountainHiker
Thanks you explained that real well. TK
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Ooops, I think 1 might be D.

"-er" words for only 2 objects in a comparison.

You know, as I think about it, I am not sure of my answers. Let me think about it some more or wait for someone else.
Hi,

He is the youngest of the two brothers and the friendliest. That seems okay to me.

He is the younger of the two brothers and the friendlier. That too seems okay. My guess is that this one is the better answer because there are only two objects. However, the "-est" form is often used by native speakers. I do it.

As both products are good, order the cheaper one from the more competent of the two clerks. Okay. This is probably the preferential form. Same reasons above.

As both products are good, order the cheapest one from the most competent of the two clerks. Okay. I am sure many native speakers would say it this way without thinking about it.

You might want to look at [url="http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/adjectives.htm#superlative"]Degree of Adjectives[/url].

Hope that helps.

MountainHiker
Hello.

Both ways using either the comparative or the superlative form are correct, although the comparative is more common. It is a matter of style rather than grammaticality.

Analysing corpora texts, most speakers prefer to use the comparative degree instead of the superlative one.

Following descriptive grammars, the comparative form is commonly used when talking about a group of two, and the superlative when more than two.

I hope this helps you.

Greetings.

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Destination_AGP,

Welcome to English Forums!

Thank you for the additional clarification.

MountainHiker
Hi CalifJim,

Deja Vu all over again, isn't it?

MountainHiker
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