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Could you please help me with these 7 sentences that I've given my opinion on?
  • I"m asking you for 5 minutes of yor time for you to read this. (is it ...FOR YOU TO READ IT???)
  • He talks down to people to make himself feel better. OK
  • Getting 2nd place twice is like coming in in 1st place once/is equivalent to first place once in terms of how much money you make. I don't know if you can say these
  • I don't mind getting undressED in front of...
  • What does your coming depend on./What is your coming contingent upon? BOTH seem correct to me.
  • How has the new year been treating you? I'd say this
  • I know where to walk so that the planks/floor don't squeak so that I don't wake my parents up. How would you say this? there are too many "so"
  • How much/many money do you think there was in the safe. MUCH because not countable right??
  • We're a little more than halfway through the movie. OK
  • He walked through the line of fire/through the gun shoot/through the shooting and was shot. Don't know
Thank you
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Comments  (Page 2) 
OK,

What I was talking about were his correction, since you commented on the "u" now I'm a little iffy about his correction, and I wanted to know if you could tell me what was wrong with the correction of my sentences up above Mr Wordy.
thank you
  • I'm asking you for five minutes of your time for you to read this.
  • He talks down to people to make himself feel better. -- OK
  • Getting second place twice is like coming in in first place once. -- This is possible, but "in in" is slightly awkward, and you may prefer to say "... like coming first once".
  • Getting second place twice is equivalent to (getting) first place once in terms of how much money you make. -- I prefer to repeat "getting".
  • I don't mind getting undressed in front of... -- OK
  • What does your coming depend on?
  • What is your coming contingent upon? -- OK ("contingent upon" is good English, but it's a more technical phrase that's unlikely to be used in everyday conversation).
  • How has the new year been treating you? -- OK
  • I know where to walk so that the planks don't / floor doesn't squeak and (I don't) wake my parents up.
  • How much/many money do you think there was in the safe?
  • We're a little more than halfway through the movie. -- OK
  • He walked through the line of fire/through the gun shoot/through the shooting and was shot. -- The first option seems better because it avoids the slightly awkward "shooting ... shot".
  • Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
    Regarding "What does your coming depend on?" - you aren't supposed to end a sentence in a preposition, so instead you could say "Upon what does your coming depend?" instead. Anit it's never 'how many money'.