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Hi,

Are the following sentences natural to a native ear?

1. He was saying that he could game the system by timing his entry and exit orders.

2. The timings of the opening of the facility and the installment of equipment are not yet known.

3. The actual workshop starts tomorrow; I am just getting in front of it by making this.

Thank you,

MG.
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MusicgoldAre the following sentences natural to a native ear?
They are reasonable natural to me. I'd use "timing" instead of "timings" in sentence 2. In 3 I wonder if you are really making (building, constructing) anything or if you are just doing something.

CJ
Comments  
1 looks fine, with #2, do you mean "dates" instead of "timings"?

3, replace "in front of it" with "ahead" to make the idiom.
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks folks.

CalifJim
MusicgoldAre the following sentences natural to a native ear?
They are reasonable natural to me. I'd use "timing" instead of "timings" in sentence 2. In 3 I wonder if you are really making (building, constructing) anything or if you are just doing something.CJ
Yes. I was preparing a document ahead of the workshop.
Just a follow up question.
Vorpar #2, do you mean "dates" instead of "timings"?

Does 'the timing' work even when I mean multiple dates ?
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I would use "date" for a specific day, "time" for a specific time, and "timing" if two events have to run on a very tight schedule.

"Timing" is usually used to talk about fortunate moments:

"You arrived just as the party started, your timing is impeccable."