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Hello,

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1. Do you think they opened the doors? They may have done.
2. I've just got a good idea.
3.He has a bookshop in the High Street.
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These sentence, according to the inquirer, are written in British English.
How to make them "American English"?

I think phrases which seem to be British English are "They may have done," "I've just got" and "bookshop."
I think the American-English versions are "I think they already did," "I just had," "bookstore."
Am I right?
But I am not sure about "I think they already did."
My reference is this page .

I am also a bit not sure whether the following two sentences convey the same meaning as "I've just got a good idea."
a. I just had a good idea.
b. I just got a good idea.

Best Regards
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In American English, you can say "They may have" or "They might have." We would not add the "done."

Either a or b would work for #2.

There's no problem with "bookshop" although "bookstore" is more common. The problem is "in the High Street." We'd say "on High Street" although we're more likely to have a "Main Street" than a "High Street." (That said, the last two towns I've lived in both had a "High Street."
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1. Do you think they opened the doors? They may have done.
Do you think they opened the doors? They may have. / They might've.

(Americans don't add "done" in such constructions.)
2. I've just got a good idea.
I just had a good idea. / I just got a good idea.
(Either one.)
3.He has a bookshop in the High Street.
He has a bookstore on Main Street.
CJ
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Thank you for the swift replies! [8]
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
High street = the main street in a town. No need for capitals.