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I am aware that cities and states are formally separated from the rest of the sentence with commas.
Example: I live in Los Angeles, California, and I go to school here.

However, how do you apply this to a school? Namely, the school in question is the University of California, Los Angeles.

Please help me with the following sentence.

1.) Through the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry, I am a volunteer for a chemistry internship.
2.) Through the University of California, Los Angeles Department of Chemistry, I am a volunteer for a chemistry internship.

Is the comma needed after "Angeles" in this case? Although it does seem awkward to have a pause between "Angeles" and "Department of Chemistry," is this the formal and correct way to do it?

Help appreciated,
rozarria
Comments  
Sorry for the barrage of questions, but I have one more question.

If I am formally introducing a university professor with a Ph.D., how should I address them in writing?

1.) Professor Ryan Woods, Ph.D.
2.) Dr. Ryan Woods, Ph.D.
3.) Ryan Woods, Ph.D.

I list #3 as an option because I realize the possibility that placing a title such as "Dr." in front of the person's name may be repetitive, since it is afterwards indicated (following the name) that the person holds a Ph.D. degree.

Again, help appreciated! Thanks!

-rozarria
Hi,
I am aware that cities and states are formally separated from the rest of the sentence with commas.
Example: I live in Los Angeles, California, and I go to school here.

However, how do you apply this to a school? Namely, the school in question is the University of California, Los Angeles.

Please help me with the following sentence.

1.) Through the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemistry, I am a volunteer for a chemistry internship.
2.) Through the University of California, Los Angeles Department of Chemistry, I am a volunteer for a chemistry internship.

Is the comma needed after "Angeles" in this case? Although it does seem awkward to have a pause between "Angeles" and "Department of Chemistry," is this the formal and correct way to do it?

The full name is certainly unwieldy, isn't it?

Don't people usually avoid the problem by saying 'UCLA'? eg Through the UCLA Department of Chemistry, I am a volunteer for a chemistry internship.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi,
If I am formally introducing a university professor with a Ph.D., how should I address them in writing?

1.) Professor Ryan Woods, Ph.D.
2.) Dr. Ryan Woods, Ph.D.
3.) Ryan Woods, Ph.D.

I list #3 as an option because I realize the possibility that placing a title such as "Dr." in front of the person's name may be repetitive, since it is afterwards indicated (following the name) that the person holds a Ph.D. degree.

Yes, don't use #2.

I would choose either Professor Ryan Woods or Dr. Ryan Woods, depending on the form that is used to introduce him to me.

(Professors are usually assumed to have a doctorate, although not all do.)

Best wishes, Clive
Hey there, Clive,
To answer your first post, I am filling in an application and want to sound as formal as possible. Is there a way to go about this, or should I resort to the abbreviated form of the university?

As for your second post, thank you for pointing out to me that not all professors hold doctorates.

Thank you a million times, Clive!

By the way, are you a moderator?

-rozarria
Hi,
The form "UCLA" seems to be widely used.

Yes, I'm a moderator.

Best wishes again, Clive
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What about when you are listing multiple cities and states in succession? Do you use a comma?

I am working on a group project and my group member used semi-colons to separate pairs of cities/states:

Dayton, Ohio; North Haven, Connecticut; Denver, Colorado; and Richmond, Virginia

Is this correct, or should commas be used in this instance?

Thanks,

Brad
Hi,

What's the context? Is this list part of a sentence? If so, what is it?

Clive

Yes, this is the correct punctuation to use to in a list that has several cities and states: To use a semicolon after the state, as the comma is used to separate the city and state.

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