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(1) I recieved an e-mail from my father which said he was coming to Tokyo tomorrow.
(2) I received an e-mail from my father which says he is coming to Tokyo tomorrow.
(3) I've just
received an e-mail from my father which says he is coming to Tokyo tomorrow.
(4) I've just received
an e-mail from my father which said he was coming to Tokyo tomorrow.

Are (2) and (4) wrong? Or are they also acceptable?
Comments  
I'm sure that you have read the arguments as thoroughly as I, Taka, but as far as I'm concerned, #2 is fine if the email still obviously exists. #4 is fine by the normal rule of sequencing-- #3 (immediate reporting) is an option, not a rule.
Mister Micawber #4 is fine by the normal rule of sequencing
Oh, I thought #3 was normal by the rule of sequencing: I thought when the main clause was present perfect, normally the tense of the subordinate clause was present...
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Konnichiwa, Taka!
TakaOh, I thought #3 was normal by the rule of sequencing: I thought when the main clause was present perfect, normally the tense of the subordinate clause was present...
This is not necessarily so. The rule says that, if a main clause verb is in a present tense, you may use any needed tense in a subordinate clause.

For instance:


He knows that you are busy today.
He knows that you were busy last week.
He knows that you will be busy tomorrow.


He has said that he receives letters from her.
He has said that he has received a letter.
He has said that he received a letter yesterday.
He has said that he will receive a letter tomorrow.

Ruslana

He said "I love Ruslana".

He said he loved Ruslana.

He said he loves Ruslana. [ This is fine.]

He said "I will go to Russian next week".

He said he will go to Russia next week. [ I wouldn't wite this.]

He said he would go to Russian next week. [This is fine.]
Thanks, Rotter. But from what I have learnt while in this forum, all the sentences you wrote are correct. Emotion: smile
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Oh, I thought #3 was normal by the rule of sequencing: I thought when the main clause was present perfect, normally the tense of the subordinate clause was present.
We may both be a little confused, Taka. In (4) I've just received an e-mail from my father which said he was coming to Tokyo tomorrow, the main (reporting) verb is said, not have received. I at least was thinking of reported speech in my initial post. Shall we start again?
(Yes, all Rotter's sentences look fine to me too.)