Please, could anybody help me out with my embarrasment.

Is this phrase correct? (The combination of Present Perfect and Past Perfect).

"I have learnt about this program from a fellow, who had earlier participated in it."

If not, what is the right way to express that idea?

Thanks in advance.
AnonymousI have learnt about this program from a fellow, who had earlier participated in it.
I say it's correct, but it would be much more natural to delete the comma.

If the "who" clause is non-restrictive, we must be able to say,

"I have learnt about this program from a fellow." Emotion: thinking

How did you learn about this program? (reply) From a fellow.

This is deliberately evasive - rude.

But you could use "fellow" as an adjective: From a fellow student.

Edit. My reply was from an American perspective. It would be like saying, "From a guy."

But I believe that in some communities, "a fellow" has a different meaning.
Thanks for the remark. Should think about this nuance.
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AnonymousIs this phrase correct? (The combination of Present Perfect and Past Perfect).
Sorry, I should have addressed the tense question.
My understanding is that the present perfect qualifies as a past tense reference for the past perfect.

I learnt this from a fellow who had/has been there.

I have learnt this from a fellow who had/has been there.
Now this somehow kicks me back. The two last examples that you have given are the kernel of the problem. Emotion: smile Let me put it this way.

Which of the following ones is the most adequate:

1. I have learnt about this program from a fellow who has earlier participated in it.
2. I have learnt about this program from a fellow who had earlier participated in it.
3. I learnt about this program from a fellow who participated in it earlier.
4. Any other suggestion?

I stake on number 2, but I am not sure. Emotion: smile

By the way, in the real phrase there will be a name instead of the word "fellow", so there's not that much to worry about, but anyways, thanks for pointing it out. Emotion: smile

And as far as the commas are concerned, I simply put them in places of inflexional drops. Emotion: smile Perhaps this is not the best rule to follow. Emotion: sad
Hi, Anon, sorry for the delay. They all have the same meaning, but in my opinion #3 reads best.
AnonymousAnd as far as the commas are concerned, I simply put them in places of inflexional drops. Emotion: smile Perhaps this is not the best rule to follow. Emotion: sad
I generally follow that rule myself, but the restrictive and non-restrictive clauses present a special problem:

the comma can completely change the meaning.

A case in point, if you replace "a fellow" with a proper name, you should change the clause back to non-restrictive (add the comma).

I heard it from Jack Jones, who was there.

If you omit the comma, the clause purports to tell which Jack Jones, instead of simply adding information about him.

Rgdz, - A.
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Avangiin my opinion #3 reads best.
Agree.

CJ