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Dear professional grammar teachers,

Please, please tell me which of the following tenses (present or past) I should use in formal writing in English. I have been checking many grammar articles about "sequence of tenses (reported speech)" though, I am still confused somehow because I often see many articles in English not following the sequence of tenses. In my understanding, I believe that I should keep the verb of the subordinate clause "present"
1) when the subordinate clause is talking about a general truth and
2) when the fact stated in the subordinate clause is still in progress (continuing).

Examples:
A) He said that he will continue the research as soon as he returns.
B) He said that he would continue the research as soon as he returned.

In the above B), it follows the sequence of tenses. However, in A), it is not, and I sometimes see this kind of sentence in newspaper articles.

Please tell me which of the sentences (case "A" or "B") native speakers would recommend me to use.
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GoriExamples:
A) He said that he will continue the research as soon as he returns.
B) He said that he would continue the research as soon as he returned.

Both are grammatically correct.

The other verbs in sentence B are consistent with the verb 'said', a past tense verb.

The teacher said, "The world is round."
The teacher said that the world was round. ('said' and 'was' are both past tense verbs)
The teacher said that the world is round. ('is' is used here because the world is round: a universal truth)
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Both sentences are grammatically correct, but they have slightly different meanings. I have changed the 'he' in the example sentence to John to help eliminate confusion in my answer:

A) John said that he will continue the research as soon as he returns.

means that at the time the author wrote the statement, John has definitely not yet returned, but when he does, he will continue the research (at least, that's what John said he would do). The only time this would be correct grammar, is if the author is certain that at the time of writing the statement, John has still not yet returned. If John has definitely returned, or even if its possible that he has returned, then it would be more correct to say:

B) John said that he would continue the research as soon as he returned.

This is a much less specific statement in terms of time, and allows for the situation that John has already returned, that he hasn't yet returned, or that he may have returned without the author's knowledge at the time the author writes the sentence. If John has returned, then presumably he is either continuing the research already, or he has broken his word.
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Comments  
In daily speech there is no need to follow the sequence of the tenses especially while u are chatting with somebody.But of coruse if you use it in formal language be careful about the sequence of the sentence.In fact try to be always grammatical:D
Thank you for your advice.
So, do you mean that both examples are correct and I do have a choice to follow the rules of the sequence of tenses both in writing and speaking if the fact stated in the subordinate clauses still hold the truth (=continuing situation) at the time of the speech? However, in formal writing, what you recommend me is to make the verbs in the subordinate clauses past/past participle form tenses as long as the verb in the main clause is the past tense?

Based on your comments and analysis, can I say:
"He announced that he was going to marry next month" in formal writing (and possibly in speaking as well) instead of saying "He announced that he is going to marry next month"?
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 Shreksbro's reply was promoted to an answer.
Nice answer, Shrekbro. Keep on goingEmotion: smile
Thank you for all your comments and advice.
You have helped me a lot in deeping the understanding on this matter.
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